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11

surreal wrote

been using Nighlty 57 for some months now and it does feel a lot faster and stable than previous versions. looks like Rust might actually work as expected.

13

CleanCoilAirPorAmerica wrote (edited )

Not only that, Rust is memory safe ;) As you said I encourage everyone to start using Firefox Nightly (currently 58) on both mobile and desktop as it has the most fresh code and is very stable in my experience (only had issues with it once so far, and I helped them by reporting the bug which got fixed -- I also recommend enabling telemetry in it as it helps them study regressions)

But it's only the CSS style system (Stylo) that is Rust for now, plus some other things, (quoting Manishearth)

  • The mp4 metadata parser. This has been shipping for a while now, and was the first shipped Rust code.
  • The URL parser (rust-url). This is not shipping, because it's incomplete and there are some mismatches to deal with. But it exists.
  • Stylo: Servo's CSS engine in Firefox. By far the biggest one, this is shipping in beta and nightly, and should be there in the 57 release for everything but Android
  • webrender: Servo's GPU-focused renderer. Not shipping, can be flipped on in nightly. Still has work to be done
  • encoding-rs: All encoding operations go through this now. Shipping
  • The U2F stuff: A lot of the U2F code is in Rust. Shipping in nightly though I think it's still off by default (but that will change soon?)

Hope in the future we can see a JS engine that is written entirely in Rust, it would completely blow off the competition.

6

ziq wrote

Since I started using Nightly, my fanless NUC has been cold to the touch. It used to get burning hot.

11

ziq wrote

I've been using Nightly for a couple weeks and I'm also very pleased.

9

Arubis wrote

Boy, I really didn't want to swap to Chrome. I'd held on through about a year ago, even despite knowing it was slower, a memory hog, and so on; at least this way, someone on my team was viewing our site in FF and would notice discrepancies. I hated to let Google manage yet another aspect of my life.

But as some point, too much was too much. Unable to bear vanilla, Google-owned Chrome, I ended up in (closed-source!) Vivaldi. It was...alright.

About two months ago, I tried out FF Nightly. And by god, it's the best browser I've ever used. And the Nightly builds are (typically) more stable than production-issue from other vendors.

So very happy to be back! Mozilla may have their issues, but I'll gladly take imperfect and pro-user over differently imperfect and profit-driven any day.

1

321 wrote (edited )

I never stopped using Firefox. Maybe the speed and memory problems were worse for people on laptops but on my desktop they weren't an issue so I never switched.

Funnily enough, one of the main reasons I preferred Firefox was that Chrome didn't allow you to use mouse gestures on the new tab page, or the settings tab, while Firefox let you use mouse gestures on absolutely any tab. And now, with Firefox 57, that's no longer the case; Firefox now also bans extensions being used on certain tabs, e.g. new blank tabs and settings tabs. So I am a bit disappoint but I guess I'll survive.

1

DarwinsCousin wrote

Firefox now also bans extensions being used on certain tabs, e.g. new blank tabs

That's not true, see this extension for example (compatible with Firefox 57+) https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/new-tab-override/

2

321 wrote

OK, so maybe in time someone will make a mouse gestures extension that will work on new tabs. But still, I don't think extensions can work when browsing addons.mozilla.org, so mouse gestures will fail there.

1

chaos wrote (edited )

Any instructions to install the beta on Ubuntu?

1

gini wrote

My entirely unscientific method of comparing browsers is to listen my cpu cooler when browser renders huge pages like wordpress blogs. Chrome still seems to use least amount of resources but Firefox has surely caught up. Hopefully plugin writers are not discouraged with new architecture and continue to do their thing with new Firefox as well.