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4

zorblax wrote

DRM? Not on my machine!

(except for Steam because I'm a hypocrite)

3

mofongo wrote

I too use Steam, but I only have DRM free games that I got from other sites.

4

23i wrote

browser based DRM? seems like there could be all sorts of security holes in that, tbh.

3

surreal wrote

well google supports it and chrome will do by default. i trust mozilla to find a way to make it possible on firefox to disable contents that contain EME or a warning or similar. decentralization needs to be pushed forward, these companies want to protect their assets and the more they have the more they will want to control the web.

4

jhasse wrote

EME is already implemented in Firefox. You'll get a notification that you'll need to download the binary blob upon first use. After that there will be a red sign in the address bar, telling you that DRM is active on the site.

You can also disable it in the settings (or never agree to download the binary blob).

0

_deleted____ wrote

This doesn't seem so bad to me.

6

Naokotani wrote

Among other things, it sets a precedent. This is the first time the w3c has moved forward with something in a non-compromise yes/no fashion similar to our sham democracies. Since there are more corporate voices in the consortium it will allow them to slowly chip away at net neutrality in ways that seem obscure to average end users, but the conglomeration of which will, in time, make the net a corporate space (another way to say as useless as tits on a bull).

3

zorblax wrote

Yeah. Importantly though: W3C has no power over the underlying architecture, so there is still the opportunity to set up underground networks that avoid the corporate-controlled space.

1

_deleted____ wrote

Like raddle?

3

zorblax wrote

I was talking more about protocols besides HTTP that sit on top of the TCP/IP layer.

1

sudo wrote

What's the point of that? HTTP is the standard, and it works perfectly well for what it's designed for. Just don't use the new encrypted media extensions "feature."

2

zorblax wrote (edited )

HTTP is the standard for delivering hypertext. There are many many more things online, from messaging platforms to online gaming to anonymity networks, where it has no place.

1

sudo wrote

Indeed. I was saying if all you want to do is deliver hypertext, there is no need to invent a new standard, because HTTP now has a new, undesirable feature. Just don't use that feature.