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7

BlackFlagged wrote

This is huge. It changes all the collapse / extinction scenarios if we can grow food in seawater after the sea rises.

3

happysmash27 wrote

Ooh, this will be great for my seasteading ventures!

1

ziq wrote

You have a houseboat?

2

happysmash27 wrote

Not yet, but my dream is to create a self-sustaining anarcho-communist micronation/commune on the ocean (Anarkikomunismolando). To be self sustaining and not rely on capitalism, though, it needs a way to make food. And this seems perfect :D

3

sudo wrote (edited )

Excellent news. Hopefully the current misinformation about genetically modified foods will wither away, so we can keep having research like this. Thanks to /u/ziq for pointing out this isn't actually a GMO. This will save lives.

5

ziq wrote (edited )

It's not a GMO, it says its a hybrid. Salt tolerant varieties have always existed, they just bred some of them together and got lucky.

0

__deleted_____ wrote

This kind of proves that GMOs are useless if a regular old breeding program resulted in yields this high.

3

zorblax wrote

why would that be proof? Most genetic modification is essentially just cross-species selective breeding anyway.

3

__deleted_____ wrote

Costs.

2

zorblax wrote

selective breeding costs lots of money too.

1

__deleted_____ wrote (edited )

Average cost to develop a GMO is 136 million...

I can make hybrids for the cost of 2 seeds and some compost.

1

zorblax wrote

could you do an intensive breeding regimen with thousands of specimens in a controlled environment with 2 seeds and some compost?

1

__deleted_____ wrote (edited )

I have a greenhouse with thousands of plants in it already, so yes. Most of the stable plant varieties we plant today were chance seedlings grown by regular gardeners and farmers.