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transtifa wrote

Reminder that state entities banning X software doesn't make it secure!

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[deleted] wrote (edited )

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transtifa wrote

I mean I still wouldn't say it's "Good" that Russia is blocking services even if we don't like them lol.

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[deleted] wrote

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transtifa wrote

I guess, but also technical solutions to political problems and all that. If Tor becomes as realistically essential to freedom fighters as we hope it will be, states absolutely have the power to make it... no longer a thing. It's more important to raise general security culture I guess?

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VoidOutput wrote

states absolutely have the power to make it... no longer a thing

I completely agree. The general response to this story was the same for the Great Firewall of China 10 years ago: "don't worry, VPNs and SSL". Now they decrypt connections on the fly and you're questionned by police if they suspect any attempt to bypass it.

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Raven wrote

Though, It's a different story with Tor. Tor Project is backed by US government, maintained by ex-military devs, and actively being used by both intelligence and military. It's a dichotomy for the US because at one hand the NSA tries to break it, while on the other hand US Navy and CIA both have infrastructure depended on Tor. Therefore, it is somewhat protected against states like China, cuz it's basically the goal of US to infiltrate and disrupt in it.

I really think because of this dilemma, Tor is still secure against most state actors. The moment Tor stop being useful for the US, it will become useless.

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transtifa wrote

Yeah. Building meshnets and places for in-person gatherings are both reallyyyy critical.

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JScFEd1ufKW5f8q3 wrote

Stock up on Tails USBs, people, we're in for a bumpy ride.

And hardware old enough to run it without being automagically backdoored.

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JScFEd1ufKW5f8q3 wrote

Thank you. Protonmail / Tutanota / "privacy email service" is a scam. Email is trash.

The best you can hope for with email that isn't encrypted by the sender is jurisdictional arbitrage. Most of your email is still hitting Protonmail's servers in plaintext- it doesn't really matter what they do with it after that point.

And other services offer things like inbound PGP encryption for some additional security while your mail waits in your inbox. As in, an actual vetted standard- not whatever Protonmail is cooking up behind closed doors.

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[deleted] wrote

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[deleted] wrote (edited )

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Raven wrote (edited )

Nah, Protonmail was developed by CERN and LHC scientists from Switzerland.

Edit, source, it was developed by CERN scientist Andy Yen when he was working on an encryption project to protect scientist communication. MIT only audited the release version.

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