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F_x wrote (edited )

What an awful youtube channel.

Edit: I would like to apologise for my remark at the source. It's a good video, and instead of commenting on it, I made a useless remark and was unwelcoming. It's not like all the stuff I post are great sources so I was quite hypocritical. I did wrong, I'm sorry and I hope you will continue to post here.

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libre_dev wrote

The guy gets kinda douchey at the end, but pointing out the hypocrisy is good.

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ziq wrote (edited )

Yeah he's a little manipulative (and politically ignorant in some of the other videos I checked out) but the tactic he's using (non violent communication) is very effective and used by anarchists like Chomsky all the time to disarm less restrained opponents.

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CircleA wrote

How does 'non-violent communication' mesh with anarchist theory like How nonviolence protects the state?

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ziq wrote (edited )

Non-violent communication doesn't really have anything to say about revolutionary armed resistance, it's just a way to communicate with people and change their minds with patience and reasoned intellectualism:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonviolent_Communication

It's also called collaborative communication and is basically an apolitical extension of anarchist mutual aid. You don't have to be an anarcho-pacifist to use these methods.

Habits of thinking and speaking that lead to the use of violence (social, psychological and physical) are learned through culture. NVC theory supposes all human behavior stems from attempts to meet universal human needs and that these needs are never in conflict. Rather, conflict arises when strategies for meeting needs clash. NVC proposes that people identify shared needs, revealed by the thoughts and feelings that surround these needs, and collaborate to develop strategies that meet them. This creates both harmony and learning for future cooperation.

Communication is really important because a lot of times we emulate our oppressors in the ways we interact with each other and I'm trying very hard to be more conscious of that; to avoid oppressive / authoritarian microaggressions that quickly add up and result in countering libertarian ideals and reproducing authoritarian systems.

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IamaScoutAMA wrote

We're trying to teach non-violent communication and peer mediation with my scout group.

We focused on separating feelings and actions when comparing "stories" when we're trying to resolve a conflict.

It's sad how little vocabulary people use when dealing with emotions, when there are 100s of them.

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ziq wrote

what kind of conflicts arise with children? It must be easier to apply these methods with children because they don't have as many learned behaviors that they have to work hard to unlearn.

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IamaScoutAMA wrote

Most conflicts arise regarding chore distribution in their teams of 6.

we only spend 3-4 weeks total a year with them and try to tackle multiple themes at a time so our scope is not extraordinary.

I find it easier to apply with 14+ than with children or younger adolescents since anything linked to language quickly becomes quite abstract and too theoretical for them. Older scouts "get" what I'm trying to teach them and have the ability to (hopefully) reuse it when not with us. Young scouts will do the activity and comply to the rules, but wont remember it: playing in the woods, carving stuff with their knives, building fires, getting dirty and interacting with others will have as much of a positive impact as what we adults prepare for them.

It's a slight exaggeration to say this, but I feel like scouts are being prepared to become old scouts, at which point the education really begins.

That's why I prefer letting the "less woke" adults look after the younger ones while tackling the older ones myself: it's more fun to find games that check whatever value i want to teach them while making them have fun, and I feel like I have a greater impact here.

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IamaScoutAMA wrote

not all scouts share this point of view, I know at least one guy that prefers younger kinds since he finds them more pliable.

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