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annikastheory wrote

Yes but have you used vim?

Joking aside that is 100% what I use to take notes on linux.

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moonlune wrote

What extensions do you use?

I use spacemacs (which is basically emacs + vim keybindings + other extensions bundle)

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annikastheory wrote

I may edit this comment when I am not at work since I can't look at my vim stuff right now. I may also add links when I am not at work if that is helpful.

Back when I was writing school papers ( I wrote them in markdown) I used the limelight and Goyo plugins. Goyo is like a distraction free mode. Limelight just highlights the current paragraph and dims the other paragraphs. On large papers, I had a shortcut for built in vim stuff related to ctags that opened a sidewindow with a table of contents and let me jump quickly between headings. Not technically a plugin but I also had a script using pandoc and libreoffice to create my footnotes/bibliography and to format the paper/create the title page according to the schools requirements (they did papers in chicago/turbain). I could go into tons more detail I wrote like half my college papers and all my masters degree papers in vim so I had a pretty polished system.

In terms of my personal note taking, not school related stuff I use vim-outlaw when I want to make outlines. I also have a modified markdown syntax file. I also have my own plugin for using FZF to easily create links to other files ( I might replace fzf with the built in vimgrep), it does a couple other things too that I can't remember at the moment. The modified syntax file and the stuff my plugin does are mostly related to the notetaking method I use which is the slipbox/zettelkasten method.

I also have a few plugins related to coding and like utility stuff, I think at least 4 by tpope on github (commentary, surround, obsession, vinegar ). also dwm.vim, but I had to alter it because it had some bugs. I don't know that's probably 95% of it.

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annikastheory wrote

I hear of a lot of people doing evil mode on emacs (I think thats what they call vim keybindings). Haven't used emacs personally. Might need to dink around with spacemac for funsies.

Anything you really like about spacemacs specifically?

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moonlune wrote (edited )

Spacemacs can be thought of as vanilla emacs with a modified configuration file (like every other emacs "distro" (doom emacs is another one)). It's basically preconfigured, polished, and ready to use emacs.

It comes with evil-mode of course, and another extensions called helm, which is an interactive menu reminding you of keybindings that softens the learning curve. There are also other extensions that are organized in "layers": extensions activate or deactivate depending on the type of file you're writing, in a pretty neat way.

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[deleted] wrote

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annikastheory wrote

Yeah learning vim is like learning an entire coding language just to edit a text file. Its not exactly accessible or intuitive and frankly for most people it probably isn't going to drastically benefit them to learn it either.

But ever since I have learned to use vim I have been obsessed with it.

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[deleted] wrote

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annikastheory wrote

If you actually care to learn it, vim usually ships with an interactive tutorial that goes over the super basics. I think you just run vimtutor from the commandline. Not saying being able to use it means it will make sense though.

But also there are a number of memes out there about never being able to leave vim so you aren't alone there.

I was literally just going to type these two paragraphs above then I got carried away I guess. So no one asked for this but here are a couple things that helped it click a tiny bit.

First seeing the keyboard/computer vi was made on here. That obviously explains why hjkl are used to move around, but also esc is closer (which vim uses a lot) and you don't have to hold shift to use : on this keyboard either. Ctrl is also a lot easier to get to as well, which I often forget vim uses quite a bit.

Second finding out the some of the commands have mnemonics (thats the word right?) which is helpful. like d is for delete and y is for yank (think copy) and p is for paste (officially its for put but in my head its paste). and w is for word and _ is for line (because its a line). so to copy a line is y_ (also yy) or delete a word is dw. you can also combine these with numbers so d3w deletes three words. or y3_ would copy three lines.

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