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Basic Tutorial for Setting Up a Tor Relay raddle.me

Submitted by NEOalquimista in LiGNUx (edited )

I have brought all the information required to achieve a functional Tor relay into one tutorial. I hope this will be helpful to those who want to contribute but can't find all the information that's scattered throughout many official and third-party websites. I really hope this will make it easier to understand and configure it.

One problem: I could not put inline images. I'd like to do that. I tried ![Image](link/to/image.jpg)

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3

sudo wrote

You should probably mention the inline image problem on /f/meta.

Also, when I set up my relay, I port forwarded from my router, not my modem (I don't even know if my modem has a web GUI). I've never heard of anyone having to go through their modem to port forward. You may want to mention this somewhere in the wiki, or restructure it so that it talks about port forwarding from the router instead.

One more thing; some people may not know the IP address of their router. I would mention that they can find this out by running ip route, and copying the "default" IP address that shows up.

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NEOalquimista wrote (edited )

Thanks, sudo. I will.

About the modem, I'll have to do some research. I use a fiber optics connection and the modem is a little different. But, really, I couldn't make Tor be reachable without turning the Firewall of the modem ON and configuring port forwarding as I did. That's why I failed for so long. If I turn off the firewall, nothing goes through it. Cannot forward ports. That's the default behavior.

That command to find IP, I did not know that one. I got all the IPs from the router interface. But ip route is easier.

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noticeweird wrote (edited )

I have an old raspberry pi laying around. Would this work on there?

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NEOalquimista wrote (edited )

I heard many people run relays on Raspberry Pi. Put Debian on it, and give it a try! It should handle the traffic just fine for your home. It just might not be enough if you plan on running a very fast exit relay, I believe. But you should stick to a normal relay if you're running it at home.

I run my relay on a netbook with similar specs as the RPi 3, dealing with ~500 KBytes per second. CPU usage never goes above 20%.

2

noticeweird wrote

Thanks! I'll give it a try.

I don't think I'll try an exit node while living overseas. Wouldn't mind running one back home, but cant really afford to get booted from the country.

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NEOalquimista wrote

I remember reading a story from an exit relay operator, describing his experience in the last years. And all he got for running an exit relay was notifications from the ISP/hosting company, which were all explained and forgotten many times. No SWAT, no FBI, no car chase. Maybe it's not that dangerous. But caution is good.

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noticeweird wrote

In my home country it wouldn't be an issue, but I'm not sure about the laws where I currently live and how they wouldn't handle it since I'm not a local.

They tend to go full law-mode to set an example, and I haven't read about any of those happening yet. I don't want to be the example.

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NEOalquimista wrote

My new relay already got a "Fast" flag and it's very active as shown by arm tool. This is only two days after activation :D