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Kinshavo wrote

And this reminds me, why we don't have a cheap nutritional deficiency test? like you spit inside shake a little bit and it will tell you what are wrong with your diet

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[deleted] wrote

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Kinshavo wrote

The spit was just an example. I mean even blood tests don't get your nutritional deficiencies rights, and a lot of issues people have it's because they don't get certainly nutrients.

I agree the better solution is to keep track and planning the meals etc, but this tell something about our medicine, we get tons of research and money to pharmacology and almost none in prevention and get quality stuff for people. I think I never was asked by a doctor about my diet in a way to check for nutritional deficiency.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Dietary tracking doesn't always help, I have a sibling with a protein absorption deficiency. So his protein intake is normal but he has health issues from inadequate protein levels in his system.

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Raxalor wrote

It depends on:

  1. The rate of vitamin D production of you body when you're in the sun
  2. How much time you're in the sun
  3. How much vitamin D your diet is contributing
  4. Your diet when you take the vitamin D (affects how the supplement is processed by your body)
  5. Whether or not you're currently vitamin D deficient

You'd probably be fine taking 100-400 UI daily, because the human body really sucks at absorbing it through supplements. As such, you're unlikely to run into Vitamin D toxicity.

HOWEVER: I'm an IT professional, not a medical one. Get some tests done by a medical professional that can tell you whether or not you actually need it.

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Ikeepforgetting wrote

I would have suggested much higher doses than others have. I take 5000iu a day, at direction from a nutritionist (for my children they only recommend 100iu on days with low sun).

Instances of vitamin D toxicity seems to be people taking 50000iu or more, for extended periods of time.

The general idea seems to be, don't take over 10000iu and get your blood checked to make sure you need it.

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86944 wrote

Vitamin D is fat soluble and it's possible to over dose. 5000IU is the tolerable upper limit for adults. I really wouldn't go above that.

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Ikeepforgetting wrote

The advice I was given was higher, and there does appear to be research to match this.

Stating this after reviewing guidelines, I note the guidelines do seem to be "don't go over 4000 without professional guidance" which makes sense.

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