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lettuceLeafer wrote

I dump it in a big pile in the yard. I store the compost by setting a dirty dish out on the counter and filling it up with compost. I often piss outside too so thats kinda compost. I tried growing mushrooms on the compost but they died. :(

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MuadDib wrote

Worm Bins! Plastic bins, 40 × 50 × 30 cm, cheap easy to come by, just drill holes in the bottom to allows water out worms in. Not much care is taken about green-brown and the older bins are basically just casings after about a year. If there is odour when I go to use them I put the smelliest material under a layer of less smelly material.

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capitan wrote

If you happen to have access to pine nut shells, that can be a good way to eliminate unpleasant odors. Just grind them up and sprinkle the material.

That said, vermicomposting should not produce an odor. You might want to root out what is causing that. Maybe you are putting too big pieces of food in, or food that the worms do not like ("spicy" stuff like peppers, onions)? I typically try to cut up my scraps a lot. Helps the worms chew through it faster IME.

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MHC wrote

I bought a box of a thousand red wrigglers.

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Fool wrote

Dig a hole a couple of feet deep, when it fills, cover it and dig a new hole. I never thought about using it for anything.

Keep a small can in the kitchen for scraps, which is emptied into the hole when full.

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MHC wrote

I use a compost caddy, with compostable liners.

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moonlune wrote (edited )

1 big neighborhood composting box (4m3) shared by everyone who wants to form the neighboring buildings. There's often plastic and other shit in it because people can't read signs so we pick out them as much as we can.

every year we just sprinkle dump some of it on our neighborhood guerilla garden before planting grains and abandoning it. People usually pick the plants vegetables before they're ripe lol.

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capitan wrote (edited )

Vermicomposting. I do not have lots of space and the worms chew through the food scraps quite quickly. No strategy for retrieving the worm casings; I am just letting them stay where they are under the bin.

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MHC wrote

Birds destroyed the top of my raised garden bed. I guess they dug for worms under the mulch.

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capitan wrote (edited )

Oof. I guess that is why most people use bins instead of open beds... Hope no plants were harmed!

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MHC wrote

One Nasturtium seedling was shredded.

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unvaccinatedcomedian wrote

got a exposed heap out in the garden and a plastic compost bin that i found out by other trash. the plastic one seems to break stuff down quicker but might be because of the content. definitely not worth buying one though. not a new one anyways.

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MHC wrote

Cover it. Sunlight kills worms!

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gracklegrackle wrote

I built a massive wooden box for outside that I “turn” once a day, or every other day. When it’s all nice and decomposed, I spread it in the garden or bring it to neighbors, but I usually let it sit for quite some time. In the kitchen, I’ll usually have a big ol’ bucket that I throw scraps in and whatnot, and once that’s full I bring it outside and dump it in the box

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MHC wrote

I intend to add shredded paper as brown matter.

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grey_jedi wrote

I've got one of those ~50 gallon compost tumblers. Thanks to Black Solider Fly larvae, the compost have been incredibly nutrient dense and ready ~2-3x faster than without them.

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MHC wrote

Today I assembled a 180 liter compost tumbler.

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AnarchoDoom wrote (edited )

  • Any dead residue from trees, starting with leaves. Suburbans got a stupid (but profitable!) habit of wiping them from their precious lawns and putting them into bags by the street. Me and a buddy been collecting tons of those last fall and we did a fantastic compost mound out of it. A year later it's filled with rich black, humid soil and some humus.

  • tiny branches from leaf trees make some good compost too, if mixed with leaves.

  • saw dust if available for cheap/free

  • coffee and egg shells.

Often cover your food waste with those, so the raccoons won't be attracted and it'll compost better/faster.

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MHC wrote

The sawdust needs to not be from chemically treated timber.

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[deleted] wrote

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AnarchoDoom wrote (edited )

It's not that super-smart, really. It's just un-dumb no-nonsense. ;) Or just doing things with that's available around.

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