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masque wrote (edited )

Competition on smaller scales like most of the defenses pose, is not inherently bad. On larger scales however, in economies, wars, and politics, competition (defining it as a drive to win) is bad for society as a whole. Capitalist systems are founded in competition, and on so large a scale it becomes domination instead.

I kinda disagree with this. The problem with capitalist competition isn't scale, it's the fact that people are forced to compete for resources and power which necessarily creates a zero-sum situation. Arguably, claiming that a competitive urge creates the problems of capitalism is backwards; rather, capitalism creates material conditions that force people to compete regardless of whether they feel an intrinsic urge to do so.

EDIT: I guess what I think is that intrinsically-motivated competition (e.g. the desire to be really good at something or to achieve great & noteworthy things) is generally good for society, but extrinsically-motivated, goal-directed competition (i.e. competition aimed at achieving a material goal that is mutually exclusive with the goals of others) is typically bad. But competitive games mostly fall into the former category, not the latter.

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naut OP wrote

Well said, my wording around “capitalist systems are founded in competition” wasn’t the right way to describe it. I love the intrinsic-extrinsic concept, I think that really encapsulates the issue. Thanks!

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RadicalConstructivist wrote

I guess what I think is that intrinsically-motivated competition (e.g. the desire to be really good at something or to achieve great & noteworthy things) is generally good for society

I don't think that necessarily has anything to do with competition and doesn't need to take place in a competitive framework.

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masque wrote (edited )

I think a lot of competition essentially consists of people who want to be "really good" using the accomplishments of others as a benchmark for what "really good" means.

EDIT: This is not the only way to measure or inspire progress, of course, but it's one that seems to work well for a lot of people.

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