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4

BrowseDuringClass1917 wrote

This is an interesting read and I can't help but wonder how this applies to other cultures who have a healthier diet without being necessarily 'white'. Do they have this same stigma about all those fancy ingredients and what not?

I know from my perspective growing up eating traditional Greek food and only Greek food that it was natural for me to branch out into ofc other ethnic foods, but it was very easy for me start eating 'white people food.'

I think in many ways this is a problem that uniquely affects black culture, and idk I guess Im just curious what yall's takes on this are.

2

existential1 wrote

Well I can say 100% for sure that this is not uniquely a black culture thing, although it is a colonial thing, which just happens to have affected black people more than any other group on this planet.

I grew up in a house where my parents cooked nearly every dinner during the week and every meal on weekends (because they were both out of the house for work by 4/5 am for my dad and mom respectively). I seriously did not EVER eat at my best friends' houses. Both of my best friends are white, one lived next door, the other 3 houses down. They ate 2 or 3 meals at my house every weekend since we were ~4 years old, and I NEVER ate at their houses.

As a kid, I never wanted to because they ate "white people food", which to me was unseasoned canned vegetables and other things, or lots of fast food. Neither of my parents are "health food" people, but they are anti-preservative and stuff. So they made the typical soul food stuff mentioned in this article, and that's what I ate growing up.

But "typical soul food stuff" is literally slave food. It is using the worst parts of animal carcasses, like their intestines, and making "food" of it. And because people have to be heroes in their own stories, we redefined things unfit to eat into "soul food". Native Americans did the same thing with "frybread". "Frybread" ain't nothing but "hot water cornbread" to black people. Basically, white people give you some (insert grain here)meal and you figured out what to do with it.

Over decades and centuries, you come to view that garbage food as a defining characteristic of your people. And the stuff that you weren't given to eat, or allowed to grow, becomes "white people food". And you are conditioned to loathe the idea of white people food just like you are conditioned to loathe the idea that white people put you in the condition you were born into, and go about their lives doing nothing to return the humanity that was taken from and denied to you, or your parents, or your parents parents etc.

It takes a lot of distrust to be able to break free from that pattern and be able to change your habits as someone born into that situation. I say distrust, because you have to distrust your culture, you have to distrust the white people that forced your people into the situation they find themselves in, and you have to distrust the medical system that aided in creating and maintaining the situation. You also have to have the means to actually get the food too, whether by growing or buying.