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_caspar_ wrote

977 (2006), The Horse Thief (1986), Pirosmani (1969), 3 Women (1977), Robinson's Garden (1988)

Painting with John (2021, series) has been the best Ive watched thats recently made

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bloodrose wrote

High Noon (1952). Watched it because my husband read something on /r/askhistorians about Clint Eastwood hating it. It was amazeballs. He told me there was a movie Clint Eastwood called anti-American and I nearly said "Stop talking right now, we're watching it."

Halfway through The Trial of the Chicago 7 (2020) and am liking it. Husband is looking up the historical stuff as it's happening and pointing out how much worse it was than the movie makes out. I appreciate when husband does his history nerd stuff. It makes movies more fun. And it's fun hearing him emote his agreement with the hippies.

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__0 OP wrote

When l I saw trial of the Chicago 7 I was really surprised by how much Sasha Baron Cohen held the movie together, there was something about the way the movie was put together that made it feel like I was watching a high school play though, although usually I'm fond of things that are adaptions of plays dialogue heavy etc, but there was something about the script, direction etc of trial of the Chicago 7 that made it really hard for me to watch. Honestly it's some very interesting subject matter as a movie, and if anyone tackles it again in the future I'd be interested to see how it compares to the direction that Sorkin went with it.

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bloodrose wrote

It is written and directed by Aaron Sorkin and very much his kind of production. It was all fast-paced witty dialogue and retorts. We had to watch it with subtitles so I could hear over my husband's laughter. You could see a lot of the archetypes he uses in his writing so you know it's more about the message than the actual real people the movie is based upon. I enjoyed it because I like that sort of film and I agree with an anti-war anti-government message.

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subrosa wrote

Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020), though I probably watched it towards the end of last year. Then there's The Father (2020), Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019), Wait Until Dark (1967), Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (1970), and I spent some time in the 1930s recently, where The Thin Man (1934) was a pleasant surprise. Don't like picking favorites :P Honeyland is going on my watchlist, thanks.

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yetanotherusername wrote

Psycho Goreman! Was really pleasantly surprised with that one. Either that or In the Mouth of Madness or Class of 1999

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