The Fascism Rising Index (2018) coinsh.red

Submitted by GrnBlck in Fascism

I recently had a go at creating an index of the rise of fascism around the world. Taking the definition of fascism as Umberto Eco's 14 points, I tracked the amount of power fascist groups held in each of their states. As fascism is an ideology centred around power, how much real state power these groups hold is the main concern of this index.

On this map you can see 6 distinct shades of blue. From light-dark blue respectively, these represent 'No Noteable Fascist Presence', 'Existance of Minor Fascist Party', 'Fascist Party in Opposition', 'Fascists form part of a Government', 'Fascists in Government' and 'Fascist State'.

As I've simplified the rise of fascism into 5 stages, they have to be considered on a case by case basis. A country without any noteable fascist movements may be that way for a number of reasons, from geographic isolation, to population consensus, to dictatorship. A country with a fascist party in opposition may actually have more power than the governing party, such as in Peru and Armenia. The point is, take this index with a grain of salt. I also may be wrong about certain countries, due to the limited amount of information available. If you need me to justify any decisions, or request an amendment, please say.

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didiDIDI wrote

This is interesting.

If you haven't, one thing that it might be worthwhile to look into for South Africa and perhaps other countries is xenophobia and xenophobic violence as an indicator of fascist tendencies occurring in that context.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenophobia_in_South_Africa

Realistically the ruling party is not fascist by almost any measures, in part because of its postcoloniality and its relation to whiteness. But there does seem to be some elements of the party, and opposition parties in the country, that enable this kind of fascistic politics.

And of course, with organisations like Afriforum there is also a substantial white nationalist lobby power here, along with various white nationalist centrepoints, like Stellenbosch and Orania. While they are a fringe element they have big apartheid money and they are organised.

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LostYonder wrote

Intriguing! Thank you for sharing. I'm curious though about the classification, if I am reading the map correctly, of Egypt and Saudi Arabia as fascist states - oppressive dictators, but fascists? Possibly Saudi Arabia, but Sisi has no ideology except power. As for Saudi Arabia, they are so hypocritical in their own ideological commitments to their narrow, fascistic, interpretation of Islam, that it's hard to take them seriously as fascists. Fascistic in their modes of operation certainly, but not necessarily fascist - though perhaps I'm making too much of a distinction between fascistic practices and fascist ideology???

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GrnBlck OP wrote (edited )

Of course!

I would compare Sisi to Mussolini, who also had no real ideology except power, and who came to that power through similar means. Sisi's strongman right-wing military regime has allied itself with Putin, in trying to install a puppet dictator in neighbouring Libya, and has been pictured doing weird shit like this.

As for Saudi, that's a bit trickier. The state itself is inherently fascististic, given its traditionalist partnership of the monarchy and wahhabi clerics. It's also going through a transition period with Mohammed Bin Salman's rise to power, though I wouldn't describe what he's doing as un-despotic either. Princes also have a habit of driving over the bridge to Bahrain to quench their thirst for alcohol. Their foreign policy, however, leaves little room for debate. They might as well be colonizing their neighbours, with their actions since the Arab Spring. Unless MBS does something drastic that pivots the state away from the 14 points, I hesitate to move them. Hypocrisy doesn't necessarily revoke their ideology.

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LostYonder wrote

Significant points, with KSA, definitely; Egypt I'm not so convinced, but ultimately a minor point in the grand scheme of things.

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GrnBlck OP wrote (edited )

This article and this one are both sources on Al-Sisi's fascist traits, from Middle East Eye. The former vice president has also claimed that fascism was rising in Egypt.

I understand your skepticism. I'll consider moving it from fascist state to fascists in government.

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LostYonder wrote

Your research into it all is much more thorough than mine.

One other question, it seems that the difference between a fascist state and fascist in government is that the former are dictatorships and the latter are democracies. Is that valid? I raise this question in regards to the US, India, and Israel (which I can't actually see what color it is on the map). Does it matter which party is in power actually? Is there really that big of a difference that elected officials make as compared to the structures of state they rule over? Democrat or Republican, Congress or BJP, each employs fascist tendencies in their rule, only one does it in the guise of being liberal, the other blatantly...

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GrnBlck OP wrote (edited )

That's correct. In a lot of those cases there is still an opposition that could (in theory) take power back. A fascist state has no effective opposition within its power structures.

You've made a fair point about the US, though I think it's important to distinguish between fascism and imperialism. The US and Brazil may have power structures that allow for a fascist takeover, however that doesn't necessarily mean they actively practise fascist ideology. The Weimar Republic was extremely conservative, for example, but I wouldn't call that fascist. That conservatism allowed for fascists to take power, as they always do. The US was always far enough to the right on the overton window, that this could happen.

There are a few countries on this that don't have noteable fascist presence because they are left-wing dictatorships. I take strong issue with their authoritarianism, but it'd be too far to call them fascist, because they don't demonstrate the same policy in practice as fascists do.

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arduinna wrote

Could I ask why Greenland is so much lighter than Denmark?

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GrnBlck OP wrote (edited )

Greenland as an Autonomous Constituent Country within Denmark has its own parliament and domestic politics. Its politics are far to the left of Denmark's, with only a few small center-right movements for unionism with Denmark, only one of them has an official affiliation with a Danish political party.

Denmark's resident fascists - the Danish People's Party, are the second largest party in the Folketing, currently propping up the liberal-conservative coalition government.

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sudo wrote

This is a great idea; thank you for making it. I would recommend putting the map legend in the actual image, instead of the description.

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