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Fool wrote

I think it could work depending on the prison...

Take the money and do a "bad job",
make friends with inmates, try to provide support,
refuse to participate in violence, conduct willful incompetence, and generally undermine from within.

But the consequences for the "bad work" is probably not worth the risks.

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bloodrose wrote

I understand the sentiment. However, how do you do this

Take the money and do a "bad job"

In what way? Like, jailors are already doing a bad job. They serve the prisoners bad food. They do not intervene in protecting prisoners from one another (rape & violence). Etc. etc. They fail at the basic necessities of keeping someone incarcerated. When you hold someone against their will, there follows a duty of care that inmates are just not afforded. So...like, would the opposite be doing a good job?

Or, would doing a bad job be helping sneak in contraband and fueling the jail economy?

The only bad job I could see being in line with abolitionist sentiment would be helping the inmates escape, lol.

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fortifiedmischief wrote

deleted my comment cause on second thought.... i simply could never imagine being a prison guard. There are a million other better ways of supporting folks in jail.

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Bezotcovschina wrote

I do understand your position, but there is far better ways to

make friends with inmates, try to provide support,
refuse to participate in violence

Being a good cop by being a bad cop is pretty much meaningless, assuming you can not being a cop at all

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Fool wrote

I'm not really suggesting that they do it, just musing how to go about it if they do.

I imagine if went through with it they would at least have lasting trauma.

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Bezotcovschina wrote

If they do, they, probably, better to leave, for more trauma.

I think, it's very naive to suppose that a system have no mechanisms to combat this particular behavior. I believe that every "good in sense of bad" prison guard will end up torturing prisoners at some point, if they don't leave. This system were building for centuries. They, likely, know how to deal with your puny sabotages, in a way that you will, eventually fall in line.

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[deleted] wrote

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Fool wrote

Probably ones that weren't really Nazi, but we're just trying to survive under the regime.

There were definitely stories of guards helping people escape in places.

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Bezotcovschina wrote

There were definitely stories of guards helping people escape in places.

Correct, there were. And there were stories of guards, joined SS to help prisoners, leading them right into the gas chambers.

I mean, if your life depends on it, if lives of your loved ones depend on it - who am I to judge you? But I doubt that now anyone's life depends on them being prison guard or not.

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temporary_ wrote

I think you shouldn't trick yourself into believing you can play such a role without getting corrupted by the structural pressure inherent to the system you'll become a part of. If you want to provide support to inmates you should simply do social work, although in some countries it has become nearly impossibile since the start of the pandemic and the restriction that came with it.

In any case, the cops patroling the streets are way worse than prison guards, I doubt anyone who tells you otherwise has ever studied prisons on a serious level or has spent a substial amount of time inside one. In countrie like mine, where the prison system is higly dysfunctional, guards have a very high suicide rate, nothing comparable to the one for the inmates, but way higher than the one for normal cops. Prisons are meant to hide the realities of our society from the minds of the common folk and the guards are part of the small group of people who can't ignore those realities, the results of this forced promiscuity in some cases are complex and ambiguous. Cops on the street just ruin your life and forget about the day after.

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[deleted] wrote

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CaptainACAB wrote

Policing has mechanisms in place for "good cops"; there is no reason to believe that prison guards don't.

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