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debored wrote

If you get lucky it might help you survive capitalism, they have some useful tools. But mostly it's problematic.

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hermit_dragon wrote

I've been super harmed by both, but psychology has been least harmful, or at least included some maybe useful tools.

Suuuuper wary of both tho - all the pathologizing and 'treatments' seem to be waaaaay more about creating compliance than easing disstress. Idk. How I feel about them is I need help bad but probably not that 'help' anymore.

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Faolinbean wrote

It's a tool. It can be helpful, but when wielded by an asshole, can be really problematic

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

Not much has changed for me since I made this post and this comment chain in relation to this.

I think they're both bad shit. Sometimes we can use elements of them in our own ways, but I think we need to destroy them both and find some kind of anti-authoritarian reparative relation to each other that we permanently exist in. Insurrectionary repair :)

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alex wrote

i have a negative opinion of psychiatry, and a slightly negative opinion of psychology. both are coercive in their current state, the former very much so.

psychiatry relies heavily on medical science--more than psychology-- with all its problems, and the tendency to pathologize people seems higher with the psychiatrists i've met or been around. psychologists usually range from be as bad as psychiatrists to being well intentioned liberals. but for all their good intentions, both these people are still able to hold you against your will in a psychiatric hospital, which tend to be bleak institutions. unsurprisingly so since they're basically a continuation of asylums, except sterile like a hospital. even many places where you check yourself in, it's possible that they can later hold you there and not let you check out.

then there's the fact that both psychology and psychiatry and their practitioners cannot currently be divorced from things like capitalism and civilization. people like to see psychologists and psychiatrists like how they see their news sources, "neutral," or "unbiased," shit like that. but these professionals come into it with all their biases, and it can be especially unhelpful that to become a psychiatrist or psychologist you need a lot of education, which costs money, which in short means these professionals are more likely to come from middle-class or upper middle-class backgrounds.

there's also the fact that psychiatry and psychology have a racist, sexist, homophobic, and transphobic history which i'm only mentioning in short here because.. it's a lot.

all that being said, i know there are radical people who work within mental health and the Icarus Project is supposed to do good work. if you think you need a mental health professional then find one, then possibly finding another one if the first one doesn't work. and there's no shame in taking pills if you need them, i'd just suggest educating yourself as much as you can on any condition you think you might have. do whatever works for you.

i'm sure i missed something, but i don't want to ramble and risk repeating myself.

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asbestosstar wrote

I think most people do what benefits themselves, even if they dont seem to know it. I psychological egoism.

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Blackbeard wrote

I suppose it depends on whether we are talking about clinical psychology, or just the study of how the brain works. I know some people who have received a great deal of help from clinical psychology, but I'm not sure about psychiatry. I think once medication gets involved, things get much more complicated. I think so much is dependent on the person receiving treatment, and the person doing treatment. If you're trans, and the person treating you has no handle on that, or has a negative view of that, it's going to be bad. If you get somebody who specializes in gender dysphoria, it might be a different story.

Psychology itself, however, makes sense to me overall. I think it's reasonable to try to understand how our brains work, both for ourselves, for understanding others. Our brains do much automatic stuff without our realizing- grouping things and people, creating biases, overlooking important details, trying to make sense of a very complicated world. Understanding those things has helped me be more forgiving of myself and others, and has helped me recognize my own implicit biases. I think those sorts of things are beneficial.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

I know some people who have received a great deal of help from clinical psychology

How is what you're calling clinical psychology here different from just having someone smart and empathetic listen to you and engage you on your own terms?

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Blackbeard wrote

I suppose the difference is paying for the experience of having somebody sworn to secrecy, who helps people with those types of issues for a living, and has spend significant time studying psychology. Some people don't have somebody in their lives that will be that empathetic, smart person. Or, they have some issue that they're not comfortable sharing with somebody they know, and feel more comfortable with leaving the person after an hour and not seeing them until their next session.

Personally, I have always tried to find somebody in my life to share my experiences and feelings with, however weird or disturbing they might be, but I understand not everybody is comfortable doing that with their friends.

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