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betterletter wrote (edited )

Pigs and sheep

gonna get one of them tattooed soon, what do you all vote on?

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Fossidarity OP wrote (edited )

I love to pet pigs when they allow me to. Their skin/hair is rough but they still are super cute.

How do you feel about goats?

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betterletter wrote

If pigs are like dogs, goats are a bit like cats... a bit more hungry and independent. they're all cute though

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

My wife and I have talked about getting a pot-bellied pig pet when our dogs die, because they're supposed to be about as intelligent as dogs.

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n_n wrote

Ducks, they are so funny and loveable.

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existential1 wrote

There was a duck at my uni that I would always keep track of. Named him Frederick Ducklous because the molted feathers on its head never went away. Looked soooo funny.

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n_n wrote

That's an awesome name for a duck. :D

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this_one wrote

Definitely cats, but considering I am a cat therian, I'm not entirely sure that's fair. If I had to choose something else, it'd probably be fat bees, 'cause they're good chunky fluffy bois.

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ziq wrote

The tortoise.

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conseil wrote

Marlins. Not really much valid reasoning- they look awesome, they're fast, and they've got spears for faces.

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zzuum wrote

I seriously love dogs and cats and cows because I've interacted with them. Large mammals are always cute

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thelegendarybirdmonster wrote

and you foss what's your favorite animal?

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Fossidarity OP wrote

I kinda like how ants thrive on garbage and how they use pheromones to communicate but they have a biological-class based "society" so that kind of sucks.

So I think I'm going for craws or jackdaws since they are super smart.

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An_Old_Big_Tree wrote

In what sense do they have a biological class-based society aside from humans projecting their own sense of hierarchy onto them?

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Fossidarity OP wrote (edited )

Maybe biological-class based isn't the right term but I couldn't find a better one (caste maybe). I'm not sure what type or if any hierarchy they have but it does seem like they don't have the most egalitarian society. Here are some very interesting snippets from Wikipedia:

Larger colonies [of ants] consist of various castes of sterile, wingless females, most of which are workers (ergates), as well as soldiers (dinergates) and other specialised groups. Nearly all ant colonies also have some fertile males called "drones" (aner) and one or more fertile females called "queens" (gynes). The colonies are described as superorganisms because the ants appear to operate as a unified entity, collectively working together to support the colony.

Ant societies have division of labour, communication between individuals, and an ability to solve complex problems.

Controlled experiments with colonies of Cerapachys biroi suggest that an individual may choose nest roles based on her previous experience. An entire generation of identical workers was divided into two groups whose outcome in food foraging was controlled. One group was continually rewarded with prey, while it was made certain that the other failed. As a result, members of the successful group intensified their foraging attempts while the unsuccessful group ventured out fewer and fewer times. A month later, the successful foragers continued in their role while the others had moved to specialise in brood care.

Not all ants have the same kind of societies. The Australian bulldog ants are among the biggest and most basal of ants. Like virtually all ants, they are eusocial, but their social behaviour is poorly developed compared to other species. Each individual hunts alone, using her large eyes instead of chemical senses to find prey.
Some species (such as Tetramorium caespitum) attack and take over neighbouring ant colonies. Others are less expansionist, but just as aggressive; they invade colonies to steal eggs or larvae, which they either eat or raise as workers or slaves. Extreme specialists among these slave-raiding ants, such as the Amazon ants, are incapable of feeding themselves and need captured workers to survive. Captured workers of enslaved Temnothorax species have evolved a counter strategy, destroying just the female pupae of the slave-making Temnothorax americanus, but sparing the males (who don't take part in slave-raiding as adults).

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Gorillas. They still have the typical 'males fight over mates' problem that most mammal species have, but inside their family units they seem to be quite gentle.

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Dirtbagleftist wrote

Pigs.

Ever since I first listened to Propagandhi's Potemkin City Limits it's been pigs.

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