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jadedctrl wrote

Maintaining lawns!

People'll spend hours every week watering and mowing the damn things, just to keep them exactly the same! They're not even really attractive-- in fact, they're kind of ugly.

I can get a garden, they're productive. I can get a flower garden, they're really pretty-- and sometimes even productive. But lawns are just terrible, bland, and an absolute waste of resources...

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zzuum wrote

Can you imagine if all those lawns were used to grow a few edible gardens instead

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rot wrote

especially in the southern u.s.

so many lawns in texas

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the_poebel wrote

Sometimes a lawn is nice to just relax on it, you wouldnt have to put too much energy in that though. But I get where you're coming from, most of the lawns are not used in any way, so why bother maintaining them.

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Freux wrote

BINGO. You listen to someone giving numbers, you mark them on your board, if probability is on your side, you win.

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Bird wrote

Competitive online gaming. People will pour thousands of hours into something that unless they are playing professionally will amount to nothing, once the servers eventually close that time spent is lost, all the effort required to become skilled at that game lost. I can definitely understand that its fun (hopefully) in the moment but once that moment is passed it just feels wasted to me.

Squawk

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this_one wrote

I can't resist my urge to respond to this one, so forgive me for indulging myself. Also, I want to say, obviously, my subjective experiences can't contradict yours, so if you think it's a waste of time for you, then it is, and I'm not trying to change your mind; only to express my own disagreement.

I've been competitively Good at one online videogame in my life (a fighting game). I wasn't good enough (and maybe also where I'm from didn't have enough tournaments or whatever) to think of making any money from it, but the fun it brought my shouldn't be understated. It also taught me (or helped me improve) a bunch of skills which are still useful outside the game: Things like reflexes, noticing patterns in other people's (any my!) behaviour - noticing what they're doing right or wrong, and thinking about how to improve - teaching/conveying how someone can improve, collecting data and making good use of it (I made spreadsheets from my games), teamwork (how to decide what information to tell my partner, and how to say it without distracting them or myself), how to deal with my emotions/perform under pressure and knowing when I'm too emotional and need a break, etc.

I'm not saying it made me amazing at any of these things, but I'm definitely at least a little better at all of them than if I'd never got good at that game.

Beyond that, it also both introduced me to some great friendships which have continued beyond most of us being done with the game, and been an excuse to continue spending time with older friends.

As well as all that, though, being good - quantifiably, measurably good - at something has been (and to a smaller extent still is) something I can point to to make me feel a bit better when my brain tells me I'm no good.

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Bird wrote

I can definitely see your points there, and thank you for that. For me it's probably because I was never really the competitive type and so I never managed to get a huge amount enjoyment from competitive games, that and probably a hefty feeling guilt for having "wasted" what time I did enjoy kind of soured my opinion on this. I might actually see if I can't find something that's competitive but that suits me more in how I like to interact with people. As silly as it sounds your disagreement might have just changed my mind.

Squawk

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selver wrote (edited )

I've always felt that games are enjoyable partially because they amount to nothing. They have clearly defined rules & objectives, completely separate from the rest of life. Games wouldn't be enjoyable if they were open to the same chaos & meaninglessness of life. There's something really fulfilling about that for some people, myself included. Games with deep strategy and a super high skill ceiling offer so much room for experimenting, learning, thinking, etc. but within a closed system, that isn't really available anywhere else.

I think they just really click with some people the right way, it's not for everyone.

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BlackFlagged OP wrote

Jigsaw puzzles. I can't imagine a more frustrating and useless task that deliberately breaking a picture up into little pieces and then putting it back together.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

I like doing puzzles. I do one about every two years if I find myself in a situation where I somehow have free time (e.g. I'm stuck with family in a festive period). In a sense it's just a peaceful process of laying something out thoughtlessly.

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TheLegendaryBirdMonster wrote

imo it's in the same niche as legos for adults and coloring books. It's a soft-reboot for the brain.

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BlackFlagged OP wrote

I guess my brain works differently because it just makes me angry putting a jigsaw puzzle together. Legos are fun, you can build anything you want, literally make your imagination come alive. Jigsaw puzzles, when you finish one, you get the picture on the box except with cracks all over it.

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Fossidarity wrote

It's not really my thing but I can see the appeal. It probably creates a mental state where you just focus on very simple problem solving and let your mind wander while doing it.

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TheLegendaryBirdMonster wrote

pets. It's a waste of time and ressources imo.

I can understand lonely people would want one but it's something I'll never have.

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Freux wrote

That argument can also apply about having kids.

Contrary to you, I can't see myself not living with little creatures that bring me joy and annoyance.

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neverinNJ wrote (edited )

Watching the mind/emotions try to entrap.

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