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ziq wrote (edited )

Only if they're on sale for as cheap as the non organic alternative. Organic food is for bourgies to feel better about the environmental destruction their jetsetting lifestyles fuel.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

the point of organic food isn't to protect the environment, really, it's to consume less pesticides into your body

any large scale agriculture destroys the environment in too many ways to count, you right

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ziq wrote

Agriculture doesn't stop being destructive when you put a green sticker on it.

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[deleted] wrote

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ziq wrote (edited )

For-profit agriculture destroys everything in its path. It turns vast tracts of the planet into desert, kills, displaces and enslaves indigenous peoples, and wipes out literally billions of lifeforms to grow a single sterile monoculture to feed the consumer class for a generation or two before the land turns to sand. Whether the monoculture is non-GMO or organic or whatever is ultimately little comfort to me when we're facing the apocalypse.

Food products being organic is great for the rich people (Europeans, Americans, Japanese, Israelis, Saudis, etc) that can afford it, because then they won't be poisoned by pesticides directly, but what about every other lifeform that's poisoned or grinded up or driven to extinction by 'organic' agriculture? It might be healthy for you on your plate, but it's not healthy for the planet or the rest of its inhabitants, and ultimately it'll bite you on the ass too when the collapse of ecosystems eventually spreads to your neighborhood.

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TheLegendaryBirdMonster wrote

What's your stance on permaculture?

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ziq wrote

I practice it everyday. I consider it our duty to heal the earth every way we can.

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Pop wrote

A few of the most interesting green anarchists I know do forest gardening.

The Amazon was a giant forest garden in which its human inhabitants were actually a good contributor to the environment. (Source, Source 2)

The people over at Backwoods in the US have published a little on this, I think, if you live there and have access to the paper.

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ziq wrote

I call it food foresting.

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Pop wrote

I learned a little about this years ago when Free Radical Radio was getting into the swing of things (like ep 74 I think),

Also just came across this:

A Political Autobiography of Dion Workman of Shikigami

Bellamy interviews Dion Workman of Shikigami (http://shikigami.net/) on his political development over his life, including: his early days in a stringent school among Nazi skinheads, developing a taste for work abolition in his teenage years, becoming acquainted with Situationist writings that radicalized him, and how he came to practice forest gardening in Japan.

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ziq wrote

I've been doing it for years but it gets harder every year because of climate change scorching everything, which is forcing me to introduce a lot more cacti and succulents to try and keep up with the changing climate.

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

It barely exists where I live. Presumably it would be too expensive if it was in stores anyway.

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kore wrote

yea sometimes I can get organic food for just as cheap as conventional especially at farmers markets.

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SleeperCylon wrote

Yes, most of the time. It usually costs about the same as non-organic produce.

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RosaReborn wrote

I can often find for the same price as non-organic which is nice, but typically my grocery shopping is based on two things: Ingredients and Price.

Maybe also Country of Origin which is always labelled; buying local and avoiding certain regions which I know are harmed by huge farming e.g. I avoid South African wines because it's all plantations that suck out the water from a country already in drought.

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Freux wrote

Yup, not because I look for it, there is stuff that doesn't seem to exist anymore without a green kind of label.

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selver wrote

Only accidentally.

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Cheeks wrote

Here in the US specifically, 'Organic' is just more green washing, big Ag market cornering, advertising/propaganda dribble. The governing body of the certification and labeling, the Usda, has made it rather challenging for small farmers to obtain it let alone maintain compliance in order to keep the label. Yet, organic big Ag is where we are seeing the consistent ecoli and other relative outbreaks. When it comes to pesticides, if you do your homework, you will see a plethora of them that are OMRI compliant that definitely should not be.

Source: first hand as a small farmer over the past half decade.

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robertoberto wrote

I do, I like to support the practices. Although there still is a lot wrong with the food production industry, it's a small step in the right direction. I would most prefer aquaponics though.

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EmeraldShark wrote

Yes, for chips, jams, salsa, and milk.
The preservatives in chips and jams wipe out your entire gi tract of beneficial bacteria.
Salsa will make you pass out because the preservatives requires so much energy to digest.
and
Organic Milk is delicious.

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alex wrote

sure, when it’s not expensive. ultimately though everything ziq said is right so it’s a shrug.

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TheLegendaryBirdMonster wrote (edited )

My family buys our stuff from the farmers themselves, we get weekly "surprise crates" of vegetables that are in season (it's called AMAP in French). We also buy veggies and milk from the farmers market once a week. We've got a monthly meat delivery delivery (AMAP too). All of these are organic, but also 100% of our money goes to the producers.

We don't buy cans, almost all veggies are fresh. We buy everything from the store non-organic.

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Bird wrote

Generally I grow a fair amount of my food, but when buying it pretty much goes to whats cheap but not horrible quality.

Squawk

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rot wrote

for produce

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Mango wrote

They taste the same. A pack of organic lettuces taste like a pack of lettuces, why the hell do you need to pay 20% extra? Also if I want organic, I can grow my own.

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