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6

jadedctrl wrote

I'd definitely be really interested in living in an urban commune— I've looked into it a bit, actually. I won't be able to join anything like that for about 4 years or so, though.

4

noordinaryspider wrote

I've seen intentional communities go South very badly. My brother described his intentional community as analagous to being married to a whole lot of people and marriages can be like prisons.

The Farm, of course, is one example of an intentional community that survived for more than one generation. I would like to believe that this is possible.

3

ziq wrote (edited )

My brother described his intentional community as analagous to being married to a whole lot of people and marriages can be like prisons.

That's giving me some anxiety. I don't think I'd like having people all up in my shit. I know I hated having roommates in college and would only leave my room to prepare food when they had all gone to sleep to avoid having to talk to them. Or I'd stay in the library until it closed at 1am to avoid them.

I always get shit from the collectivists on here when I voice antisocial sentiment like this.

4

noordinaryspider wrote

It's still reality.

He owned ten acres of land surrounded by common land and was constantly getting accused of living or growing food on the wrong side of the border.

They threatened to kill his dogs because they didn't know how prevalent ticks were in that area. It was too easy to blame the "weirdo with too many dogs" to be worth looking up basic information in the encyclopedia, I guess.

You've caught me on a particularly "I hate the world" day but this was a relatively well known back-to-the-land community that was founded in the late '70s with the best intentions and the highest ideals.

4

lookin4 wrote

I used to live in two different communes and visited a few in the past. AMA (ask me anything).

5

PerfectSociety wrote

were they both urban communes?

How many people?

How did you guys divide up tasks?

Was there sufficient privacy?

What were the finances like - rent, costs, etc...? Did you save money by doing this?

What kinds of creative group projects did you undertake?

3

lookin4 wrote (edited )

were they both urban communes?

Yes. One in a city with inhabitants >50.000 and the other >500.000

How many people?

We we're about 25 people, with a wide range of different ages.

How did you guys divide up tasks?

It depends. Everybody is responsible to keep their own room clean, if they are able to do it physically. The house-kitchen was cleaned by one for all on a date, where they had time to do it voluntarily, usually after the common supper prepared also by one for all that evening. Preparing food before and after that for oneself is done on its own. To get bulk supply of basic food, toilet paper, detergent etc. for all of us was a voluntary task of one, to get basic drinks of another one. All other nutrition stuff (e.g. favorite jam, clothes) was individual.

Was there sufficient privacy?

In my opinion: Definitely. Everybody has it's own room, which could be locked.

What were the finances like - rent, costs, etc...? Did you save money by doing this?

Ground and house were bought a few years before my moving in by the founding communardes with money they saved, they got as wage and funds by friends and supporters who already built similar projects and a credit from a so-called leftist bank.

The communardes and their friends founded a collective in form of a corporation for legal purposes, whose only task is to act as property owner and to ensure that no single person or the board as a whole can abuse their power to sell everything. With statues, social charter it was ensured everyone who lived there is a member of the collective, share their income, that majority vote make way for consensus. It also describes how to act as landlord and tenant at the same time.

What kinds of creative group projects did you undertake?

We had a sharing economy, meet regularly to talk about our individual and common expenses and variation of our income. There were a social assembly to exchange on our joy, curiosity, bliss, worries, anxieties, rage, insecurity, ... In working-groups we discussed about necessary repairs of the house the collectively-owned car, reproduction work, upcoming visits and events, our cooperation with the community-supported agriculture, accommodation, giving workshops, networking...

Two times a year we did trips, and another two times, in spring and autumn, were used to commonly do huge maintenance work around the house.

3

ziq wrote (edited )

No, I can't stand cities or a lack of privacy.

A rural commune, on the other hand would rock.

4

noordinaryspider wrote

I can't stand cities and will probably die of exposure before trying to make a life in one. I don't see myself as being much of an asset to an intentional community at this point (pushing 60, vision issues, require electricity to access oral nutrition) but perhaps I might be able to do some sort of menial labour such as scrubbing toilets. Perhaps it might be less expensive to throw some garbage scraps at me than to hire a professional toilet scrubber.

Who knows. It sounds better than any other likely future. I can conceptualize it if I have a radically different appearance (pale skin) that cannot be ignored and can be used to explain away cultural differences (The Gringa Beggar) and used as an excuse for avoiding language other than two or three grammatically incorrect phrases that mean:

"Because my family doesn't want me any more."

"I don't know because I was very drunk at the time."

"Me scrub you toilet fifty cent."

It sure as hell isn't telling old family stories to the toddlers and teaching the teenagers how to make old family recipes when all the kids come to visit for Thanksgiving, but it's got to be better than what is realistically most likely to be my ultimate fate.

3

GaldraChevaliere wrote

My folk are trying to get our own rural commune going somewhere down the next couple years, but are probably gonna be stuck in the city for a while. I'm so tired of cars.

4

noordinaryspider wrote

I'm stuck in a little city but at least I got out of a big one.

I feel you.

Too bad I'm the one whose >you-aged kid hates them for moving from a big city to a little one.

Maybe families are just like that. Anyway, I'm glad to be posting on the same thread of the same internet forum with you, for whatever THAT's worth.

3

mofongo wrote

I would, but seriously depends on how it's implemented. There is one in my city but in practice it's roommating, with all the usual issues. No one wanting to do the dishes, people smoking in common areas while everybody is there, not even the small garden was saved. And the issue of finding a place big enough for everybody.

I've heard of places that have implemented it well, but it can be troublesome.

6

PerfectSociety wrote

From what I've read, it works well if comprised of people who share the same basic principles and goals about how to handle collective work.

2

Pop wrote

Would be great - big ones don't exist where I live though

1

Just_An_Author wrote

I personally think the idea is rather appealing. I'm also strongly considering trying to start a co-op on my way out of college.