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3

bloodrose wrote

It's entirely too much work. I used to be a sysadmin back in the early 2000s. I ran linux at home and sysadmin'd some BSD systems. After the crash, I got into another field. Now, I just use windows because it doesn't require time and research to use. And knowing how to use *nix systems is no longer part of my job so it feels like it would be a second job just to run my laptop at home at night. I'm happy to hear of another solution that isn't too much work, so please, prove me wrong. :)

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noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

You said: So please prove me wrong.

So I'm just going to say:

https://trisquel.info/

because it's easier than fucking windows even if you do decide to go with vanilla Ubuntu for the Wifi drivers or even the proprietary shirt like Skype.

Early 2000s were a blast and I'd love to shoot the shirt with you about it sometime, but you don't have time for that now. Or the crap Gate$ and Crapple are pulling for that matter, IMNSHO, and whatever I feel about Ubuntu and all the trolls on the Trisquel boards, the simplest solutions are sometimes the best.

I'm not promising not to pick your brain on "least bad" windows security for my crotch fruit, of course. :P

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bloodrose wrote

Can it run on a convertible laptop that has a touch screen?

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noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

It ran great on my Lenovo X200T and still does on my X60 tablet/laptop convertibles. :)

I use a program called Xournal for most of my stylus-writing. The kiddo was learning to use a fountain pen last year, but the year before that we were pretty much paper-free. He increases the size on .pdfs of workbooks about content subjects to make the lines fit his muscular development.

You may need to grab Wacom2 libraries, but it's a dependency so just sudo apt (I still "-get", but you don't have to any more) mypaint in a pinch.

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edmund_the_destroyer wrote

As I've written elsewhere, I'm not going to condemn anyone. I just respectfully request that if you're interested and have the time you download something like Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support) and put it on a USB flash drive, and boot your laptop from that. If everything works out of the box, consider installing it. If not, forget it. There's a good chance everything will work.

Maintaining Linux isn't a second job. I've hit a few install headaches with my machines, and everything else just works. On one laptop I had to research and purchase a Linux-compatible USB wireless device because the builtin wireless wouldn't work, and on the same laptop battery life is poor. Installing my printer drivers for our newest printer was a pain. Our previous two printers were a Canon and an older Epson, but our new Epson required extra work.

Since installation, everything has worked fine with no effort for years.

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bloodrose wrote

I'm due to purchase a new laptop soon so I will give it a shot. My experience on the amount of work it takes to run a linux system is admittedly very old.