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8

Tequila_Wolf wrote

In short, just thinking about it is emotionally overwhelming.

4

noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

I understand.

I started by using Windows versions of common Gnu/Linux programs. There was this site called GnuWinII at the time that aggregated them and also gave me relevant sections of Free Software, Free Society to read as I looked for what I needed.

Unfortunately, it's down now. It wouldn't be any big deal for me to find you a single Windows version of a Gnu/Linux program, nor would it take much time for any one of many people who care about you to do the same.

After that I started playing with Live CDs, which would would be either DVDs or bootable USB sticks in 2018. You can still access your files from Gnu/Linux, but your Windows install is unchanged when you shut down and boot into Windows.

From there you can dual boot....or even better, did you know that not being able to boot off of an external hard drive is a Windows thing?

So yea, it's a process. It's intimidating to think about as one giant chore, but that's how it kind of broke itself down into doable little steps and turned itself into a really fun hobby for one loyal (and sometimes rather pushy, lol) Gnu/Linux fan.

I'd love to share the enjoyment I get from my hobby with you or any other GNUbies in whatever capacity would be most helpful.

2

MrPotatoeHead wrote

Making a live Linux Mint bootable USB drive is only a few steps, and well worth it. People can learn how well their existing hardware works with it. I learned that my printers were found, driver was downloaded and installed, and everything just works. It was easier to set up than Windows 10, which can be pretty easy when doing a clean install from a USB stick made with MediaCreationTool1803

3

ziq wrote (edited )

have you considered setting up a bootable usb stick? then you can boot into linux through the stick without affecting your main system.

https://tutorials.ubuntu.com/tutorial/tutorial-create-a-usb-stick-on-macos

or for a private-os with tor out of the box

https://tails.boum.org/install/

4

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I've done that before, some years ago. It's a bit much for me now to take the time to make it worth doing.

5

emma wrote

battery life was really awful with kde neon

3

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Yuck. Yeah, my Linux laptop has pretty awful battery life. I don't care because it doesn't move much, but I understand how that's an obstacle. I wish I had a solution to offer, but I don't.

5

frostycakes wrote

Look into TLP and powertop, both of those made a big difference in my Linux battery life. I don't know why more distros don't have them installed by default.

1

dark wrote

I don't know why more distros don't have them installed by default.

Strong agree. My laptop has gone from dying from being left in sleep overnight, to preserving almost 100% of it's sleep-point battery.

3

Bells_On_Sunday wrote

I think using a more lightweight WM would certainly help. I don't have any problems with battery life using XMonad and debian.

3

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Interesting. I switched a laptop from Windows to Linux, and I would expect the battery life to be roughly similar even with a heavyweight desktop. It wasn't, battery life cut in half.

Of course, that's a statistical sample of one and it was four years ago. Maybe a newer kernel or different hardware or both would make a substantial difference.

3

Bells_On_Sunday wrote

Yeah, there's no real reason it should be but KDE was always a hog like that IME. Could definitely be worth trying again and maybe seeing if you like any of the more minimal desktop envs/WMs (XFce, iceWM, XMonad etc). I love how blazingly fast a minimal linux setup can be even on old kit, and battery life is correlated to that.

4

PerfectSociety wrote

I don't have the time to learn to use a new operating system unless it's very user-friendly to people who are noobs with software (like myself).

2

buzz wrote

you could try elementaryOS (i say with no experience using linux in any capacity)

1

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I used elementaryOS for a few years. It's nice, but it has a user interface similar or maybe identical to Apple's OS X. I don't know how close they are, I haven't used an Apple product for more than a few minutes in decades. So if PerfectSociety likes an OS X -style interface, it's a good fit. If they are more comfortable with something like Windows 7, less so.

For what it's worth I use Ubuntu MATE Linux, which has a similar user interface to Windows 7 except that by default the menu to access features (like the Windows 7 start menu or programs menu) is on the top left of the screen instead of the bottom left. Xubuntu Linux also has a default layout like that. Both can be adjusted to match the typical Windows 7 approach, but I got used to the menu at the top.

But again, pressure to switch is counter productive. I would be pleased if you and PerfectSociety gave it a try, but I won't condemn you otherwise.

4

GaldraChevaliere wrote

Lack of technical knowledge, time, and worries about accessing programs that I use to interact with most of the people in my life, who generally also lack the technical knowledge and time to switch over. The annoyance of putting up with Win10 and skeevy latest shit Windows is pulling is definitely pushing me towards swapping to Mint or something, but the time I usually have set aside is reserved for friends and my support network.

4

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

All my personal computers only have Linux.

But as a general thing, getting people to switch from their preferred technical environment is incredibly hard. If you're not really passionate about the thing you're switching to or extremely angry at the ecosystem you're leaving, you won't bother.

And really, as much as I hate that I don't blame anyone. Changing away from something you're comfortable with is hard. So I'll gently recommend Linux when I think it fits, but I don't push it otherwise. I've had an open offer to help people move to Linux for most of my social circle for a long time and so far I've had 3 successes and 100+ "no thank you"s.

3

noordinaryspider wrote

I haven't had any better luck than you have.

Even when Windows/Mac users see screenshots of a three year old clicking "OK" on the Ubuntu installer and not needing any help at all except for password and username, they want to see a little "supergenius" and say, "I could never do that! Where does that child go to SCHOOL?!?!?!?!?!?!"

I'm trying to STFU more on the mainstream web and just say "doesn't work with my device" and "can't because my device is old" when I don't want to enable javashit or buy crap at some store that my telephone doesn't even have.

My telephone doesn't even exist. I use Sopranica so that I can reply to SMS messages through my usual XMPP client.

4

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I understand. When you use Windows or Macs sometimes you don't know how something works, so you plug in "Windows 10 add ...." in a search engine or "OS X 10.3 add ..." in a search engine. It's no different for Linux, or anything else. But people get so used to one domain that everything else seems alien.

But for context, I consider my own inflexibility. I don't know how to make more than a basic stir fry or cook pasta dishes more complex than noodles with a sauce. I want to be better, but I just don't put the time. I hate paying a plumber for a lot of simple fixes, I should learn what I need to do more myself. But I don't put the time in. Likewise for sewing, music, dance, car repair, and dozens of other domains. So I'm definitely not a polymath, I just happen to be flexible inside the tech domain. I can't blame someone else who can do fifty things I can't for being inflexible inside tech.

3

noordinaryspider wrote

I really only become intolerant when it affects me, such as when I have to cancel other plans to try to figure out how to encrypt email on iOS for someone who refuses to use Thunderbird, which I already know.

It's humiliating, but sometimes the most expedient solution is to look confused and tell the cashier who harvests spammable email addresses for mallwart, "I....I just don't know. Sonny always has taken care of punk youters for me but he's not here right now because the gummit needed him to go to eye rack right away so I just don't know what my email address is."

My talking senior citizen's flip phone made me want to punch people in the face, so I just use Sopranica now and carry a pen and a memo book for everything else I would actually use a phone to do,

3

nov wrote

GPU support. Buggy webcam drivers. Wonky power management at times. HDMI port doesnt work properly (part of GPU support). MS Office for work. Back in the day, WiFi support was awful, and video drivers were suspect. I used to dual boot, but have switched to WSL for quality of life.

I like Linux a lot, but there is too many edge cases that are frustrating enough that I don't want to commit my personal and professional life to the eco-system.

2

edmund_the_destroyer wrote (edited )

The situation is a lot better now than it was in 2000 or 2005. If you're motivated, put Linux on a USB flash drive, boot into that, and see if it works.

I've got two laptops and two desktops running Linux, and the only hardware headache is the builtin wireless in one of the laptops. I did have to research Linux-compatible USB wireless devices and buy one for that laptop, but otherwise all hardware worked properly on install with no special work.

(Edit: Sorry, I forgot to address Microsoft Office and webcam drivers. I don't have any webcams, so I don't know how their hardware support is. There is a project called Crossover Office from Codeweavers that supposedly runs Microsoft Office on Linux, but I have no idea as to how well it works. I completely understand if either of those issues is a blocker.)

2

nov wrote

Yeh, the wifi and video drivers have come a long way since dapper drake, when I first lost some hair dealing with them.

But GPU for computation, laptop power management, and web cam drivers are issues right now. I switched to WSL this year after getting sick of rebooting every-time I needed to use a particular tool chain. This was with ubuntu/lubuntu.

2

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Understood. Sorry, I thought your earlier references to GPU headaches were for GPU drivers in general. That's mostly resolved. But I know a number of GPU computing tools aren't available for Linux, and understand how it would be a blocker.

3

Freux wrote

I have windows for gaming and that's all. I can only play a few 2D games on linux because the 3D doesn't work correctly and newer games run a version of openGL too new for my old computer. The future looks promising though.

3

KacperTheAnarchist wrote

The warez community is focused on Windows games. If more Linux Steam games get their DRM cracked I will jump ship ASAP. Are there any cracked Linux game sites around? Because I only buy games if i like them.

2

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I'm going to make an idealistic suggestion - if you have the time or money, please consider supporting some of the fully open source games.

In a better world all the best games would be free-as-in-freedom. DRM in games only exists because the most fun games are more in demand than the fully free ones.

2

KacperTheAnarchist wrote

Sadly, none of my liked games are free as in freedom (obviously) except from Tux Kart. Who doesn't like that masterpiece?

1

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

Understood. I'm fond of 0 A.D. and Nethack and Nethack-alikes, but my favorite games are Plants vs. Zombies (1) and Starcraft 2, both proprietary and I'm not aware of free software clones that measure up.

3

bloodrose wrote

It's entirely too much work. I used to be a sysadmin back in the early 2000s. I ran linux at home and sysadmin'd some BSD systems. After the crash, I got into another field. Now, I just use windows because it doesn't require time and research to use. And knowing how to use *nix systems is no longer part of my job so it feels like it would be a second job just to run my laptop at home at night. I'm happy to hear of another solution that isn't too much work, so please, prove me wrong. :)

3

noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

You said: So please prove me wrong.

So I'm just going to say:

https://trisquel.info/

because it's easier than fucking windows even if you do decide to go with vanilla Ubuntu for the Wifi drivers or even the proprietary shirt like Skype.

Early 2000s were a blast and I'd love to shoot the shirt with you about it sometime, but you don't have time for that now. Or the crap Gate$ and Crapple are pulling for that matter, IMNSHO, and whatever I feel about Ubuntu and all the trolls on the Trisquel boards, the simplest solutions are sometimes the best.

I'm not promising not to pick your brain on "least bad" windows security for my crotch fruit, of course. :P

3

bloodrose wrote

Can it run on a convertible laptop that has a touch screen?

3

noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

It ran great on my Lenovo X200T and still does on my X60 tablet/laptop convertibles. :)

I use a program called Xournal for most of my stylus-writing. The kiddo was learning to use a fountain pen last year, but the year before that we were pretty much paper-free. He increases the size on .pdfs of workbooks about content subjects to make the lines fit his muscular development.

You may need to grab Wacom2 libraries, but it's a dependency so just sudo apt (I still "-get", but you don't have to any more) mypaint in a pinch.

1

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

As I've written elsewhere, I'm not going to condemn anyone. I just respectfully request that if you're interested and have the time you download something like Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support) and put it on a USB flash drive, and boot your laptop from that. If everything works out of the box, consider installing it. If not, forget it. There's a good chance everything will work.

Maintaining Linux isn't a second job. I've hit a few install headaches with my machines, and everything else just works. On one laptop I had to research and purchase a Linux-compatible USB wireless device because the builtin wireless wouldn't work, and on the same laptop battery life is poor. Installing my printer drivers for our newest printer was a pain. Our previous two printers were a Canon and an older Epson, but our new Epson required extra work.

Since installation, everything has worked fine with no effort for years.

1

bloodrose wrote

I'm due to purchase a new laptop soon so I will give it a shot. My experience on the amount of work it takes to run a linux system is admittedly very old.

3

[deleted] wrote (edited )

4

zzuum wrote

You can play games that are now viable for linux because of steam play by using proton, which is the open source repository steam play uses on github

3

AndMyAxe wrote

I'm the kind of person who wants to keep all my devices running the same OS, and as far as I know there aren't any Linux Phones.

Also, iCloud is super-convenient for keeping all the important files accessible across my devices. Back when I used Windows and needed to transfer something between my desktop and laptop, I'd have to do it through a USB and it was kinda tedious. These days everything I need is just there already.

4

surreal wrote

android is linux

4

[deleted] wrote

3

AndMyAxe wrote

For the same reason I like wearing clothes of a uniform colour. It just sort of bugs me otherwise.

Besides, having everything running the same OS makes inter-device interaction a lot easier. The iCloud thing I mention probably wouldn't have worked if I had an iPhone and a Linux computer, for example.

3

edmund_the_destroyer wrote (edited )

I hate Microsoft as much as I hate Apple, but to be fair OneDrive should synchronize files between Windows machines as well as iCloud does. (Edit: There are also a number of third party applications that do the same thing. That includes syncthing, although that's mildly technical to set up.)

I have Linux machines, and I used to use periodic rsync commands to synchronize data between them. I'm switching to using 'syncthing' as an experiment.

4

AndMyAxe wrote

I don't know if OneDrive was a thing with Windows 7 already (which was the last Windows I used), but I remember having to work with OneDrive to return some school assignments and it was really inconvenient. iCloud is a lot easier to manage, at least IMHO.

3

edmund_the_destroyer wrote

I have to use OneDrive for work and it seems passable. But I trust your judgment, I only touch it a few times a month.

3

wisefool wrote

For me it's just habit. I've been using Apple since the Apple II computer and when the Mac rolled out I was an instant fanboy.

Though I've moved on from 'loving' Apple a long time ago, it's a prevalent OS in my general industry (web development, graphic design, animation design) and while it's not privacy perfect out-of-the-box, it's can be with just some adjustments to settings.

I use Linux a lot too, but only in a terminal using commands (all web servers are like that) and while I enjoy it, I'm still faster with a GUI interface when working. But like I said, that's habit.

1

Just_An_Author wrote

shrug sheer inertia, mostly. I've occasionally used a linux machine, but both my main computers came with windows on them.