Comments

You must log in or register to comment.

8

darsa wrote (edited )

I was in American Middle School when I got an arbitrary punishment for something I didn't do. It brought me to question why the teacher, the vice principal, the principal are above me. Then why my parents are. Then why anyone has the right to say they're above me or worth more than me or know more than me.

It was somewhat natural from there, after growing up and actually thinking about it in a way that made more sense (I signed up for this site recently, the day I turned 16) and my searches online lead me to anarchist literature; the ideas of horizontal organization, consensus, and of course the dissolution of hierarchy all came to be natural following my thoughts in my earlier childhood. Since then, I've been highly political and an advocate of anarchy, even if I don't understand most branches very well and only read some.

I know the beginning example is hollow and doesn't hold up to the other examples in this thread, it just really is the first time I can remember beginning to question why this world is how it is, over a minor detention.

7

RedEmmaSpeaks wrote (edited )

It's a classic case of "starting as a liberal, because things are effed up, but they just need to be reformed," before after many years, crossing over into "the system's not broken; it's doing exactly what it was intended to do in the first place" with also Dietrich Bonhoeffer's quote "We are not to simply bandage the wounds of victims ground beneath the wheels of injustice, we are to drive a spoke into the wheel itself."

7

bloodrose wrote

I was a communist until I read this: https://archive.org/details/ManicardiFreeFromCivilization

Will I remain an anarcho-primitivist forever? Probably not. But that's where I am now in terms of my views. They are evolving and other people and materials are influencing my views as well.

4

noordinaryspider wrote

tfs

I was gonna turn commie for fourth grade but my kid's first girlfriend's mother got thrown in prison somewhere somehow for some reason I will never know much less understand for the crime of walking across a border in the middle of a war during her fifth month of her first pregnancy so all I got was this lousy existential crisis instead.

But it's all good. I didn't really want to cut off parts of myself to fit in anyway.

7

trashcan wrote

I don't like the term "personal politicization", but I really developed the outlook that I have after a lot of small factors throughout a life of feeling like an outsider and never quite buying into the lives I was told I should have. It helped that I had a couple important teachers who taught me to look at the world for myself at a relatively young age.

5

lookin4 wrote

I didn't find any better on my dictionary, do you have a good suggestion? I like your paraphrase but it might be to long for a post-title.

3

trashcan wrote

Yeah. Making it concise is challenging for me, too. "Worldview" might work, but that could probably be interpreted different ways. The way you phrased it works, though. I just don't consider anarchy to be politics.

1

noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

"Worldview" isn't going to work in the US because of something called "Dominionism".

It takes too long to explain and my links may be dead so suffice it to say I like the way you are brainstorming but keep going unless you are happily a securely USAmerican-free in which case, look! A pretty butterfly!

7

PerfectSociety wrote

I started gaining interest in politics in high school and I started forming more in depth political positions in college. It was more of an interest that grew on its own rather than attributable to a particular memorable source.

6

ravengrace wrote

I was always a lefty at heart but when I was radicalized and learned about anarchy it was through volunteering at an occupation camp. Met one anarchist and a couple months later I found myself part of a huge community :)

6

lookin4 wrote

For me it was the upcoming obligatory military service, initiated by a official letter.

3

ziq wrote (edited )

Been there. Spent most of my childhood dreading it. I could never do commands.

5

ziq wrote

Just every fucked up smuglord authority that ever fucked me or people around me over.

1

noordinaryspider wrote

God bless the motherfuckers and I hope there's a special place in heaven for them and they never get to have any fun at all!

English translation: I am so sorry for your loss.

5

zzuum wrote

To be honest, reddit's random subreddit button brought me to /r/anarchism.

8

ziq wrote

But what made you stay?

2

zzuum wrote

Admittedly i was pretty much an ancap, but the sidebar cleared that right up. Tried engaging on other subs like socialism but they are clearly inept at being people rather than an article posting board that pisses on anyone not of their liking.

4

jadedctrl wrote (edited )

I was in that cringy "atheist community" bit on YouTube, which got me into liberal politics. At the same time, I started getting into the Free Software community.
Because of my interest in liberal politics and Free Software, I read some of Aaron Swartz'es essays— one of them on socialism. While that essay didn't have much substance in the end, it let me be a bit more curious and open-minded about what was drilled into me as “evil” for my entire life.
After that, I started reading more leftist texts, got into the leftist subs on Reddit, then eventually jumped ship to Raddle.
I wouldn't consider myself an anarchist right now, but I've been becoming more and more questioning of authority since coming here. :p

4

videl wrote

Well, it was definitely built up for a very long time but the straw that broke the camel's back was my first office job. It was a job that - for my age - people would consider me having "made it." But the job was pretty much meaningless and possibly actively harmful.

After being miserable working too much, I just thought "if this is what success in this system looks like then fuck this. Why am I even being paid for this? Everyone would be better off if I was paid to specifically not do this and to do nothing."

From there I sort of lost the ground beneath my feet, became very curious about everything, read more books in the few years that it's been than I have my entire life previously, and now here we are.

Useful part: I remember the first couple books that really brought me around were Miya Tokumitsu's Do What You Love and the Malcolm X autobiography. So if you want to radicalize office workers, maybe think of 1 these books.

4

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I don't have a simple moment, I can trace its beginnings as far back as some of my earliest memories.

I was briefly a student in a town with an anarchist infoshop, where I devoured the literature and where I met a range of people, two of which completely changed my life.

2

ziq wrote

two of which completely changed my life

How? Have you repeated their method with others and found success?

3

Tequila_Wolf wrote

They had elements of their politics that were brilliant and transgressive and vastly more developed than mine I quietly worked my ass off to live up to their faith in me and my sense of who I wanted to be. I still do.

2

noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

me too

That's one of the things I admire about you, but not the only one.

3

noordinaryspider wrote

It's more like waves and resonance than a single event but I think it all can be traced back to a little girl who looked up to her horrifically abused and misunderstood trans brother and a little boy who was left unattended with the "A" volume of his cousins' obsolete World Book encyclopedia and happened to read between the lines of a ridiculously oversimplified insult to Anarchists everywhere and everywhen.

I'll never know, but his idea was to write a story about what happened to children of political dissidents like the ones on the headlines in the newspapers in the early 1970s.

"Annie" became a very believable character and essentially who I thought I would be if I had been forced to live her life.

I wasn't, but I was forced to live my own life and I never once forgot that "Annie" was a nickname, even when I thought that my own instinctual gut-level political beliefs were a noxious oxymoron because I wasn't smart enough to understand communism OR libertarianism.

It's so exciting to find not only a huge group of Raddlers, but this enormous body of literature. I still can't bring myself to read Neitzsche until I can consistently spell his name correctly, but I love reading what Shahin has to say about him here:

https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/shahin-nietzsche-and-anarchy

and I love, even more, the fact that there is a bookmark in my browser software so that I CAN read Neet-shuh any time I darned well feel like it no matter what my kid's psychiatrist or my kid's student loan advisor thinks about it.

Does that make any sense at all?

No worries. I'll just edit it until it does or a mod will delete it for me if I can't.