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7

ziq wrote

I feel like anything I'm passionate about would have all the joy sucked out of it in an attempt to commoditize it to fit into capitalism's gross little bubble.

That being said, I'll go with botany. Even though all the botanists I know are just pesticide mixers.

7

klave wrote

Came to comment this. Choosing to study what is currently your hobby is nice in theory. But after 1+ year it makes me regret it.

4

noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

Yea, I came to say "One of each, please." but after reading ziq's comment I think a more honest answer is that I would rather firebomb a university than pay it to indoctrinate me, but first I'd loot the arsenal and use it against anyone who tried to siphon up the hopes and dreams of my cubs and auction them off to the highest bidder to increase the profits of its shareholders.

5

daniel wrote

I went to college on a full ride thinking about botany initially but settled on general biology. Turns out I just wanted to be a farmer, that is what I am doing now.

5

RosaReborn wrote

This I love my field of study, Material Sciences, and I wish I could delve deeper into it because there are so many interesting topics and room for research to grow. But most of what they teach is what is economically exploitable and careers in the field are invariably some of the most capital feeding in all of science: namely "how do I make this but cheaper" or "how can I get a passable product but cheaper"

4

RosaReborn wrote

But also I'd love to study Literature and possibly dabble in art history or something similar

4

trashcan wrote

Yeah. That was pretty much my experience. I went into computer science because I used to love programming, but university killed that. If I were there again I'd study like philosophy or art history.

6

lookin4 wrote

It is easier for me to list and for you to read the following to determine what I don't want to study but am allowed to by law. Also it has a side effect: it keeps the list short)

  • business administration / management
  • computer science

As compulsory education is over for a few years now and I am an adult I would like to study free and independent for my whole life, but not because of a future degree that comes into sight after a few years.

There is so much interesting to experience and to learn - strictly speaking I like the generic idea of schools but not their "design" (like the admission requirements, the costs, bureaucracy, duties, hierarchies between teachers and students, potential elite setting and so on)

5

noordinaryspider wrote

Fuck Jeff Bezos and every crapple fanboi on the face of the planet; steal this book here instead:

https://archive.org/details/NeverTooLate-JohnHolt

hth

4

lookin4 wrote

Thanks for introducing me to John. It seems that nearly his whole work was translated, but "Never too late" not. Did you read it? Would you say it is written to be easily understandable by those whose first language isn't english?

3

noordinaryspider wrote

I've lived it for over 30 years and have no plans to buy a financial aid advisor so I can become "normal" any time soon.

John Holt made an effort to use simple English that could be easily understood by non-native speakers. Of course "Never Too Late" was not one of his more popular works, because the subject matter was adult learning and the historical context was "the space race", which is analagous to the US' current ridiculous educational policy of "staying competitive with China".

You should be fine if you're able to access information from Nonfiction English children's books written at the fourth grade level. This would be intended for a nine or ten year old neurotypical child.

If you're not quite there yet, it's still some simple and reasonably pretty English to study. It's been so long since I've read it that I can't remember any specific little gems like "Birds fly, fish swim, and children learn." but he's full of them and you'll find the right Easter Egg at the right time.

Feel free to PM me or email me at riseup (same username) any time you want to geek out. Mr. Holt's literary heir exists and Arvind Gupta and I did steal this for you but I'm not sorry and I don't care.

His message is more important than the money: it's not too late. Education is not something that can or should be bought and sold.

It is not advantageous to society as a whole to deliberately create an ignorant underclass.

May or may not be able to pull a few strings and piss off a few people enough to steal a copy in your native language if it exists, but no promises and not likely to happen particularly promptly, just lmk if that's a rabbit trail worth sending a demon dog from hell to chase down. ;)

5

selver wrote

I've been teaching myself some 3d modelling & game design lately, so maybe something related to that. Digital art.

Or philosophy+economics.

Does anyone have experience with going to classes without paying for them? I've heard some anarchists talk about doing it before. Been thinking about doing that for the upcoming term, when I have the time.

5

LostYonder wrote

Depending on the university, it wouldn't be that difficult to attend classes without being a fee paying student - particularly large classes where there is no attendance or it is done electronically. The professor would never know who belongs or doesn't. Smaller classes would be more difficult which is unfortunate as that is where discussions take place, where you can really challenge the warped minds of the other students and even the professor. Though some profs might not care, just come up with some story about wanting to sit in on their class, ask their permission and they just might allow you.

To get the most out of it you would have to lift the assigned books, but that would be quite easy I would imagine.

In the humanities and social sciences at least, most classes are about reproducing existing knowledge, playing into the capitalist commodification model of education where knowledge is reduced to a book published for profit by a corporation, despite the fact that many of the faculty are opposed to the capitalization of education.

There are very few classes these days that really encourage thinking and critical analysis. But there are some spaces still around most universities that are alternative spaces that attract those who refuse to move along with the herd. Many of them can be quite radical - but they are on the fringe of the university, not part of its central operating system.

Another alternative is to attend the many public lectures held across universities. They are free and outsiders are usually quite welcome. Many offer free food too! You can listen to visiting academics, various forums, workshops, and conferences on a range of topics. Most centers and departments that have regular talks have email listservs you can easily get on to know what is going on.

5

noordinaryspider wrote

Yea, I "went" to Stanford in the '80s.

Hanging out at the student union is great if you can invest in a good costume from the local thrift stores first. You may need to spend more money if you want to get away with peeking in doors, looking at your watch (smartphone?), and muttering believable stuff like, "I'm going to kill Jenny! We're already late and she KNOWS I can't read her handwriting.

Mostly I just wasn't too obvious about it and didn't expect it to by anything more or less than what it is: stealing an education from a very broken system.

More recently, I've "shopped" for online community college classes (in '00s) by digging through the dumpster in the back of the bookstore of the brick and mortar school and the dollar discount bin/free for shipping/usual sources of textbooks. Tuition sucks but textbooks were the real expense when I was stealing educations for my (double-digit aged) kids.

hth

4

zzuum wrote

I loved the religious studies classes I took in undergrad. I also loved taking Hindi classes in grad school. Horticulture would be cool to learn. But as other users have pointed out, I don't think I'd like to get a degree in either, just learn a lot of each.

I also am learning guitar, but I honestly don't want to take classes in it, I just want to learn on my own.

1

noordinaryspider wrote

It's a great instrument for self-study. I know I took one "afterschooling" type class as a teen, but if I ever took a class when I was majoring in Music, I cannot even recall right now.

Being able to grab the tabs gratis of the interwebz is great, but it's still such a social instrument if you can find people to jam with.

I have a silly idea for misusing audio editing software for cyberjam sessions. I doubt if I'll shut about about it before you're ready to join in the fun.....if you want....

1

zzuum wrote

Ha, unfortunately I'm unversed in any audio software, but I am willing to learn in the future.

1

noordinaryspider wrote

I'm using Audacity, which worked out of the box when I was running Ubuntu and will also run on Windows and Mac, but I wound up sending someone a great big file of static now that I'm running "Boring old Vanilla Debian" so I'm not there yet either, lol.

It would be fun, though. I'm not consciously trying to get "better", I just want to enjoy playing what I want when I want and I miss the social aspect of being a not-so-great but passable rhythm guitarist and background singer.

La la la shooby dooby doo; look forward to seeing you on /f/guitar.

4

amongstclouds wrote

Psychology/Philosophy with the intention of being a therapist.

4

Tequila_Wolf wrote

That's something. I tend to write of psychology as a whole as mostly capitalist garbage but if it was done together with anticapitalist critiques of it and towards liberation rather than normalcy/cooptation it could be quite cool.

Do you know any good therapists?

4

amongstclouds wrote

Most of it is capitalist garbage and just an attempt to dominate people through less overtly-violent means. I want to play some part in at least opening people up to the idea of radical mental health, for instance. I also really just want to help people, because all of our problems are not solely societal. It's a very complex web on conflicting causes and effects.

One of my dear friends finished her master's a couple years back and she does art therapy for children with autism and it's truly beautiful work.

I am also from a military city and have always been around lots of trauma and as much as I may dislike many of those people I know they are victims of the military-industrial complex in many different ways. But their traumas lead to more trauma (which is why you find an increase in sexual assault and violence around militiary bases all over the world) and I just feel compelled to help.

Empathy is a curse sometimes.

2

noordinaryspider wrote

How about "life coach"? You could go ahead and hang out your shingle and be a lot less threatening to certain clientele.

A therapist is a medical professional and a red flag for employers, landlords, potential mates and dates, etc.

A "life coach" is kind of a silly thing to spend money on, but we all outgrow that kind of behaviour. Next question, Mr. job interviewer/judge/landlord/etc.?

1

amongstclouds wrote

I actually dropped out of college 5 years ago for this exact reason. Sadly, without a piece of paper that says I did something for a long time and a long of money there are many recourses that I will be cut off from. All of the books in the world won't truly prepare one for such an endeavor.

The thought always comes rushing back and it's the only think I would personally willingly dig myself into debt for. #yolo

1

noordinaryspider wrote

Meh.

You could waste more money on stupider products. I don't even remember/know/conceptualize what I sold being able to pay off my credit card every month for.

I think it was some strange combination of avoiding my phobia about thermal paste and not wanting some cop to think I was an unfit parent and steal my kid or something.

You've got the gift, anyway, even if you do have to use it within the limits of an xtreme-ly broken system.

3

amongstclouds wrote

You're probably right. It's just tough knowing how to use my strengths in a way where I can help people and also not starve.

4

md_ wrote

I am fortunate enough to be studying something I like, but I wish I had the option for a minor in Computer Science or programming more specifically.

University takes way too much time from my life, to the extend that I only do things I enjoy, like reading literature or learning new languages if it is part of my degree (otherwise it would have to take time away from working to fund being a student, or time from studying). I want to be able to make more substantial contributions to Libre Software, so any chance to learn how to program (principles, and popular languages in libre software development like Python and C++) would be very welcome, but my uni doesn't have anything like that.

3

LostYonder wrote

If I could imagine learning something new in that kind of environment again I'd go for computer science - how I'd love to be able to hack and dance my way around other people's computer systems...

3

RandomNoob wrote

Graphics and computer design and online marketing so I will be capable to sort out when companies try to trick us

3

Tequila_Wolf wrote

I'd like to do an interdisciplinary degree in a radical department around decolonisation, archives, and pedagogy. Also I'd want to learn more local languages, about local plant life, math theory (Riemann and Gauss's differential geometry and calculus so that I can understand other stuff I'm reading right now), whatever badass philosophy people are reading, history of theology, loads of shit.
I guess that doesn't really answer the question though.

2

PerfectSociety wrote (edited )

Formal education tends to take the fun out of learning for me. But if not for that, I think I'd really enjoy studying Physics. Physics was my favorite subject in high school and I would have majored in it if I had chosen not to go the Pre-Med route. I probably would have tried to become a Physicist if I had not wanted to be a doctor.

1

noordinaryspider wrote (edited )

I've been trying to study Physics as a hobby for awhile, but combined with what I would rather conceptualize as math anxiety than dyscalculia, I just wind up with "hobby world problems" and keep putting off reading that book or that article that I want to read until absolutely everybody I love has a perfect life and my house is so clean you can see your reflection in my toilet bowl.

Pretty much anything is going to cause the same problems while you're in school. In light of your major, "sleeping" is probably a hobby I should be pushing you to explore, but yea, reality sucks sometimes.

I hope you can squeeze in a bit of Physics into your day to day life and thank you for everything you are sacrificing to study Pre-Med.

You are very brave.

2

PerfectSociety wrote

I'm actually almost done with medical school. I was talking about the past when discussing Pre-Med. Thank you for your encouraging words, although I think it's a bit of unfair praise to call me brave for pursuing medicine. All forms of necessary work should be praised and appreciated.