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8

Pop wrote

class reductionism

single-issue activism

big-man theory ('ism' with a person's name / fetishising individual contributors to theories)

"the march of history" and teleological thinking

mediated politics / vanguard politics

6

ziq wrote (edited )

big-man theory

This is a very common one. The devotion to Noam Chomsky American anarchists have is so unshaking that they'll attack anyone critical of his ideas, even when they themselves disagree with said ideas.

The same things happens with Stirner and Kropotkin. Stirner fans can really get lost in the rabbithole and end up rejecting anarchism altogether because it stands for something. "What would Stirner do?" becomes their mantra for literally every question they approach.

5

Pop wrote

Sometimes it feels frustrating how it's so clearly one of the good things about anarchism that we don't have a white man with facial hair as our posterboy, and then anarchists get so high on kropotkin and the bread book
read it if you like and get over it, there's new shit since then and new shit all the time, and stop pretending like anything comes from one person

I wish we'd leave the dead white guys in the ground instead of carrying them around on our backs

5

glitter_v0id wrote

class reductionism

Can you expand on what you mean by that? it's a term i'm unfamiliar with but if i've parsed it correctly sounds like one of my pet-hates with left discourse.

5

Pop wrote

In short, it's radicals who have a "class first" approach to resolving issues, an approach that assumes that class is the foundational oppression

often with the assumption that once we deal with class the other things will be easy or will fix themselves
enough that some of them will say "we'll worry about that poc/women/gay/disabled stuff after the revolution"

You see forms of this e.g. in manarchists/brocialists saying that arguing about gender is just divisive, we should focus on class concerns

and usually this is the kind of leftism that dismisses intersectional concerns as airy-fairy sjw stuff

5

glitter_v0id wrote

Yep. Those people. Those people who can't for a second see that class issues, feminist issues, race issues, gender issues, ableism issues, ALL INTERSECT and you cannot address one without addressing them all.

Unfortunately every aspect of this intersection seems to have its group who feels the others can be addressed "later".. Least common in ableism i've noticed probably because its intersection with race and gender - and by nature of these, socioeconomic class - is harder to ignore but they still exist.

4

ziq wrote

"We can tackle that after the revolution" is about the cringiest thing any radical can say.

4

glitter_v0id wrote

I'm genuinely unsure how you can reach this kind of radical without recognizing this intersection... it clearly happens but seeing the intersection was my tipping point.