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14

zorblax wrote

The limits of computation and mathematics.

11

PainlessEphemera wrote

The history of ‘60s pop and rock music. You would be surprised how many good bands there were during that period. It almost makes those claims on compilation albums that third-rate psych rock bands made lost masterpieces seem believable.

9

NEOalquimista wrote (edited )

Airplanes. Flying is such a wonderful thing. So much space up there. Less boundaries, no walls, no concrete. It takes us closer to feeling free. Too bad it's not free (as-in-beer). I have a miniature 747, a 737 and the Airbus A320 in my room. Consequently, I love birds. I envy them, actually.

EDIT: by the way, I use FlightGear with a simple Saitek joystick. I don't fly as much as I used to, but always keep it installed for those moments.

6

Copenhagen_Bram wrote

What's your graphics card? Does it work with any of the operating systems from this list? Please tell me I don't need proprietary hardware/software to enjoy flightgear to the fullest.

4

NEOalquimista wrote (edited )

Intel HD Graphics 5500 w/ i3-5005u, 8GB of RAM and SSD. I run with rendering options on "low", and only fly with the Cessna 172, because that's the only one I know how to fly properly. I don't see any lag this way.

Assuming they didn't remove FlightGear from those free distros for some specific reason, it should be there, and you should be able to run it with only free software, AFAIK.

2

Copenhagen_Bram wrote

No, it's there. I'm just worried that it being there is sort of sad and pointless because there's no good hardware that'll run it fast, that's compatible with the staggering-behind-capitalist-spyware-software free software available.

4

NEOalquimista wrote

I read not long ago that Intel is improving a lot on the latest integrated graphics. My 5500 is running games I didn't expect it to run. I never bothered too much to buy something from NVIDIA or AMD. But maybe the future is brighter as they improve their approach to open source software.

2

sudo wrote

I believe the AMD graphics cards have speedy libre drivers.

8

yaaqov wrote

Making up languages (conlanging). As a kid I was really into it, and it's pretty much the reason I'm a student in linguistics now. But my interest in it has changed towards critique; many conlangers uncritically perpetuate racist and colonial cultural views in their practice, among other shittiness. It's one of my dreams to help push conlanging towards being an activity that isn't so exoticizing as it often is now.

8

ArbitraryHuman wrote

Well, here goes:

  1. (More of an annoyance, but eh) People thinking that Chinese uses an alphabet.

  2. Film vs. Digital (You can’t beat celluloid)

  3. The restoration of old mechanical objects and their accessories to working order

  4. Organizing documents by date down to the minute they were created, in their date-appropriate folders and sub-folders

  5. Helping my north American fellows pronounce other languages correctly, even if I only really know the phonetics of the language in question

  6. Spelling/writing reform for the English language

  7. The art of using the aforementioned old mechanical objects and accessories (e.g. typewriters, still film cameras, motion picture film cameras & projectors, phonographs, etc.)

  8. Pissing off my school administrators by putting an IWW sticker in a bathroom stall every day of the week

7

not_AFX_lol wrote

one of these things is not like the others...

6

ArbitraryHuman wrote (edited )

Indeed XD

They still haven’t figured out it’s me yet, which makes things even more fun

8

amongstclouds wrote

It's 'Colour' and NOT 'Color'.

6

jadedctrl wrote (edited )

Hell yea, spot-on!

8

buzz wrote

on this- I don't think the english language should have to privilege to deny language change that simplifies expression and language learning due to its current stance as an international language. The complexity of english is very bad considering that much of the world must learn it but not as their first language.

9

jadedctrl wrote

That's very true.
Related: /f/esperanto

7

buzz wrote

i find esperanto has its issues too, such as its flawed treatment of gender that some proponents of the language defend. regardless i think i am going to start the duolingo course now have a nice day!

6

jadedctrl wrote

As for gender in Esperanto, I'd recommend using -iĉo for masculine and -ino for feminine nouns. With -iĉo & -ino, every otherwise defaulting-masuline noun is gender-neutral unless otherwise specified.
Oh, also, using ĝi as a gender-neutral pronoun. It might seem a bit weird, since ĝi usually translates directly to English as "it," but Zamenhoff intended it to be used as either "it" or as the gender-neutral pronoun. I don't see people use it like that often, though :s
I think Duolingo'll call you dumb if you use either of those, but most Esperantists would understand you just fine.

2

F3nd0 wrote

As for gender in Esperanto, I'd recommend using -iĉo for masculine and -ino for feminine nouns. With -iĉo & -ino, every otherwise defaulting-masuline noun is gender-neutral unless otherwise specified.

I strongly advise against this. There's no essential problem with using “-iĉo” to mark male gender, but changing the basic meaning of words defined in the Fundamento needs to be avoided. Instead of doing that, we could have either a new affix which neutralizes the gender, or add new, gender-neutral roots to the existing masculine ones. (Forming new roots by attaching a suffix to the existing ones could work, too.)

Using “ĝi”, on the other hand, is entirely correct and I recommend it as well.

2

F3nd0 wrote

On flawed treatment of gender: Esperanto is missing several gender-neutral names for various people. That includes family members, clergy, and nobility. Aside of those, no other words are linked to a specific gender. Many proposed solutions have been refused as unacceptable, mostly because of the “Fundamento”.

“Fundamento de Esperanto” is a book where the language's creator defined its basic grammar and vocabulary. He declared it “untouchable”, so that no one may make changes to it, despite any flaws the book may entail. That was done because everyone has their own ideas about the ideal language, and may prefer different a solution to each problem, severely fragmenting the language. Indeed diverse reforms have been proposed for Esperanto, but they were generally refused, and the community has sticked to the Fundamento. This may be a big reason as to why Esperanto has not fallen apart yet, nor has it changed much in essence.

Therefore, I believe defending the Fundamento – with all of its flaws – is entirely reasonable and even necessary. That's not to say there's nothing to be done about the flaws. Fundamento allows for change and evolution of the language, and any solution within those boundaries would generally be acceptable. However, many proposals cross those boundaries, warranting their refusal.

That written, I wish you a pleasant journey with Esperanto! And whenever you see a proposed reform for it, make sure you don't rush to support it before giving things a proper thought. (It's a very common beginner's error!)

4

MrPotatoeHead wrote

I would argue that today, understanding ones meaning is more important than correct spelling. It's one of the downsides to globalism. I say potatoe, you say ...

3

acx1 wrote

calculating ibnr using.the chain ladder method

2

[deleted] wrote

2

yaaqov wrote

What do you consider overcooked?

1

rosalique wrote

Not OP but I think rubbery eggs cooked in vegetable oil are the worst. I'm not into crispy edges on eggs either but that's more subjective.