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Tequila_Wolf wrote

I've been reading a bunch of stuff about anthropology. . David Graeber's Fragments of An Anarchist Anthropology might be my favourite of his work. And it's relatively short too. I enjoyed it quite a lot for a few reasons and would recommend it to people who are interested critiques of academia and anarchists in academia, thinking through the uses of anthropology as something primitivists rely on, how we relate to human nature, and what we think social sciences should be for.
He also clearly makes a case against majoritarian democracy of all kinds, so maybe his pro-democracy language is just semantics. I don't know. He's techno-optimistic under anarchy and all but its not enough of a feature that the book gets painful.

I've also been reading a bunch of local stuff, e.g. Christopher McMichael's Shoot to Kill: Police and Power in South Africa. It reads a bit like a South African version of Kristian Williams' book on cops. Hopefully will finish that this week.

I've also been trying to read a bit of Marxist and anti-Marxist stuff because I'm having to be around some over-educated Marxists a bit more at the moment so I hate the idea tha they might use some kind of expertise to try to outflank me. I prefer not to second-guess myself around people who are way more educated than me.

And yesterday because I was interested I downloaded that Islam and Anarchism book that was posted a couple days ago an read the introduction. I'm very curious about it because it seems to be proposing an anti-colonial approach to the problem of Islamic assimilationism in the US that draws from anarchism and Deleuze. The idea that a Deleuzian metaphysics can work with a transcendent god is intriguing and I'm curious what they will have to mangle to make that work. It's weird shit like that that has the potential to give you new ideas (sometimes) imo, even though all of these theistic anarchisms seem fundamentally to miss the mark for me.

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fortmis OP wrote

Wow so much great stuff.
I'm curious about the Graeber book... and speaking of anthropology, have you heard of Archeology of Violence by Pierre Clastres? It's a series of essays about indigenous communities in South America -- an analysis I guess of their power dynamics and the use of violence in very specific ways. I haven't finished it and am regretting daily my decision to leave my copy in another country.... Can't wait to get at it again.
Bless your work dealing with those Marxists hehe. I'm sure your preparations will aid your defense and the preservation of your dignity! \

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

I haven't read it yet, but increasingly I'm interested to check out his stuff.

I'd also love to read a contemporary anarchist speak to the limitations of Clastres's work. But people are quite serious about him even today. Deleuze even uses his stuff quite consistently, with some adjustments. The few anarchists who do eat shit their way through academic type work often produce really remarkable work.

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fortmis OP wrote

Haha your last sentence took me a few tries, until I realized "eat shit" is a complete verb unto it's own hahaha

I'd also be interested to see contemporary critiques. Not surprised to hear most people are still boosting him. His work is truly remarkable, like nothing I've ever read before. He must've had a really sensitive presence and insightful eye, in order to be able to reflect on situations the way he did. I think his work is also holding its own as a rebuttle (travelling to us from the past) to Graeber's The Dawn of Everything

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Tequila_Wolf wrote

ntil I realized "eat shit" is a complete verb unto it's own hahaha

Ah yes, sometimes my idiosyncratic language is even more obvious. This is bad security culture lol

I think his work is also holding its own as a rebuttle (travelling to us from the past) to Graeber's The Dawn of Everything

I was too bored by the book to get through it. Would you be willing to explain the positions and the rebuttal?

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