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veuzi wrote

I have a Roland MP-600 analog synth/"electric piano". It's a fully polyphonic synth using divide-down oscillators, but it roughly emulates the sound of a Rhodes/Wurlitzer electric piano rather than being a string machine as is more common with that design.

It was produced from the late 70s to the early 80s. The serial number of mine indicates that it left the factory in 1981.

As for how I got it, I found it abandoned in the attic of the previous place I was living at.

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__0 wrote

Thats an awesome find!

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veuzi wrote

It's in OK condition too, was probably sitting there unused for decades. The volume knob is crackly. I could fix that with contact cleaner but I just leave it on max and adjust the gain on my audio interface's preamp. The only other issue is a constant, low buzzing sound coming from the transformer that leaks to the audio output, so I have to use a noise gate when recording.

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cyberrose wrote

My kitchen table is +150 years old some chairs maybe older.

My politics are more than 200 years old.

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asterism wrote

The Sony PS-FL1 turntable from 1982 I believe.

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asterism wrote

I bet some of the records predate that too but its impossible for me to tell.

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veuzi wrote

Easiest way to tell is to look up the record on Discogs. The sleeve will also sometimes indicate a year of production.

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stagn2 wrote

I have some of my great-grandfather's farm tools that still do their job well, an axe, a hoe, a sickle.
at least 70 years old but also more

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__0 wrote

I have a couple records from the mid 1950’s that i listen to semi regularly, i used to have a very old silver spoon that i got from a thrift store and used to own a piano from probably around 1910 that i got for free (but was very hard to get into my house) i have a painting that was gifted to me that is supposedly from 1870 but I think its a counterfeit. I want to sell it but i have no clue about it.

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mindforgedmanacles wrote

A Bowie knife look-alike that belonged to my grandfather. It was made somewhere in Germany in the 1910s, and (if the stories he told me were true) might have been used in street combat sometime during World War One.

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NOISEBOB wrote

I have a pipe organ from early 1900's.. it's fun to play but it is very squeaky and mostly used as a furniture.. why do you ask? :)

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wednesday wrote

i have two fairly old musical instruments.

the older of the two is a German factory fiddle made at some point during the 19th century (the mass-produced instruments from this time period are very difficult to date accurately). this is quite a nice example of the development of assembly lines in early capitalist industry: while fiddles were traditionally made largely by a single person (either a workshop owner or one of their apprentices), these factories worked on a division of labour approach where one person would be responsible for a single part of the instrument, and the parts would be assembled into a complete instrument at the end.

i also have a Rudall Carte flute from around 1920 (this one is much easier to date using its serial number). this is an "1867 system" flute, a modified version of the Boehm system used for classical flutes which was designed to be more similar to the older simple-system flute. Rudall Carte (formerly known as Rudall Rose) was also an early pioneer of the assembly-line method of instrument manufacturing in London. this instrument is made of cocuswood ("Jamaican ebony"), a hardwood similar to African blackwood which was widely used for instruments and furniture, nearly to the point of extinction; although it survived (barely), it's almost impossible to obtain in any quantity today.

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Majrelende wrote (edited )

Ah! so I can't say my acorn cracking stones.

I would say my rusty lumpy "grape" hoe, though what it has to do with grapes is beyond me. They seem to grow fine in old meadows and up trees with no hoeing.

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Fool wrote

A bunch of tools from my Dad / Grandparents.

I have a few items at the moment which are 50+ years, but I'll probably go through my dad's garage soon and claim some more, pretty sure there's some carpentry tools over 100 years old past down multiple generations.

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Bird wrote

Oldest device electronic wise? Probably an old Zenith radio from the mid 1930s I think, still picks up local stations pretty clear, although those are slowly disappearing.

Oldest simply artificial object? I think I have an old lumber axe from vaguely the mid 1800s, been through probably far too many handles over the years. Sharpened many times but still does the job pretty well.

Squawk

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roanoke9 wrote

Lost nearly everything I own six times over the years. Some very old books, oldest early 1800s. Some, like medical text from the 1950s I use to see where doctor's heads were back then (it was not a good place) Some, I practice bookbinding, but that's a low tier hobby I don't get around to much. An old 1960s? tablesaw so heavy that, though it works, I have yet to build a sturdy enough table for it to safely be used.

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