Submitted by d4rk in AskRaddle (edited )

philosophical question: Do the means justify the means?

I mean like is it ok or necessary to commit bad means to bring about good means for an end (assuming the end is good)

Ex. Think of a mobster who creates a laundry shop to launder money, you go to a job in the laundry shop, use the money you earn to get your kid through college. After learning where your wages came from, would you still have worked there?

Alternatively: do ends justify ends

Like should a good end or goal need to exist in order for a good end or goal to happen? (assuming the means are good)

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lentils wrote

(assuming the end is good)

Aren't you asking if the end justifies the means here?

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Basil wrote

Yeah to me this is kinda asking do the ends justify the means, but in the case the ends are another set of means. But it's still asking if the ends justify the means.

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d4rk OP wrote

nope

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lentils wrote

Well then I don't see how an action could be its own justification. I'm not sure anything can justify an action other than its results if that makes sense.

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Fool wrote

The means doesn't need to justify the means, it is the means.

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moonlune wrote

I believe that action is more important than belief.

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Fool wrote

Alternative:

One will know in their mind if their actions have been sinful.

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roanoke9 wrote

Your example teaches this lesson : it is a good idea to know what is going on around you in order to make an informed choice about anything. Your example also assumes college is good, work is acceptable and that money is a nuetral tool. I don't know what else to tell you.

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