Submitted by stagn2 in AskRaddle

Although I try in every way, I can't tune in my "tech / hacking" side with my "wild" side. Trying to generalize I do everything mediocre and nothing very well so should I specialize in what I like most?

Rewilding requires a lot of dedication especially for me I would like to be a lone wolf somewhat extreme: self-sufficiency, surviving in wild, using only hand tools, and moving only by foot or bike even over long distances. Obviously physically it is very hard and also requires dedication to have good physical fitness, but it is also hard mentally. From a civilized perspective, scentific logical thinking rapresents inteligence, those who write computer codes do mental work, while the wild do only physical but it is not so, to live in the wild requires a huge amount of interconnected knowledge and skills.

As I said before for me "rewilding" takes a lot of time, but also going forward in scentific\technological studies takes a lot of it, e time i spend programing is time i don't spent in mountain. also that I struggle to keep the focus on both, is like the my "hacker mindset" is incompatible whit my "wild mindset".
Maybe is a bulshit but i am afraid that the artificial environment and logical thinking required for math/programming stuff, damages the optimal ability of the brain and body to "operate in wild status"

I also believe that I don't like studying and being in front of the computer and it doesn't make me feel good. In fact it ends up that after a while I'm at the computer I lose "vitality", I lose the enthusiasm to go to the mountains, I end up on video games and youtube, and all this makes me feel bad. In the wild is the opposite, I find vitality ..... and I end up feeling good.

Up to now it has been a personal discourse but it makes me raise more general questions: Is important that there is anarchist who know very well how it works and use technology, for example without we would not have free software, including raddle.
doesn't this lead to division of labor?

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lettuceLeafer wrote

Idk I think for people who wanna resist the status quo taking a philosophy similar to china's unrestricted warfare applied to the individual is good. U should be good at whatever u can be good at and enjoy. So don't pick one because being too non civ or being too reliant on civ are both weaknesses and u should be good at both. Both are good so u should become as competent as possible so it's easier to reach ur goals. No need to restrict oneself.

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moonlune wrote (edited )

I don't like [...] being in front of the computer

Don't study computers then! You will be miserable your whole life. You can study animals and plants and rocks if your parents want you to study something. If you're still in school it's not too late to change (it never is but it's easier when you're still a student).

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stagn2 OP wrote

I dropped out of school very early lmao I decided to continue studying on my own in a more "anarchic" way, without following school programs.
Studying computer science critically and in my own small way trying to use technology in the "wildest" way helped me understand the bullshit of solarpunk techno-utopias. Maybe "studying" helped me to have a clearer view of the world and to embrace more radical anti-civ positions, but maybe now it's time to move on

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Majrelende wrote (edited )

I have always found that anything that gives me a deep feeling of wrongness or unease-- including opinions-- turn out to be the wrong path. If you can, I hope you can focus as much as possible on your wildness, since it seems to be the path that is... yours. When the prefrontal cortex drags along everything else to their displeasure, that still is rule, just internal.

I made a similar choice a while ago, and feel that it made me a whole person again; it also turned my anarchism around sharply, and my perception of reality in general.

Up to now it has been a personal discourse but it makes me raise more general questions: Is important that there is anarchist who know very well how it works and use technology, for example without we would not have free software, including raddle.

In a community sense, I suppose, knowing how to live wildly, as you call it, is infinitely more valuable than knowing about technologies you don't like that much. There are so many people these days who know how to program, and so few who know the intricacies of living in a place; the latter is a knowledge that cannot be found in any book, but can only be passed, it seems, by teaching people directly and physically, or through experience and direct communication with Nature. A problem is that there usually aren't any people of the sort, or viable ones.

doesn't this lead to division of labor?

Who cares? Not everyone has to know everything, just enough to live happily and without hurting others.

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stagn2 OP wrote

Thank you, I really like your comment and it is very encouraging

Some concepts I cut from my post because they were too long and confusing, I found them in your comment exposed in such a way as to clarify my ideas and make me understand several things

the latter is a knowledge that cannot be found in any book, but can only be passed, it seems, by teaching people directly and physically, or through experience and direct communication with Nature

A problem is that there usually aren't any people of the sort, or viable ones

This matches my experience, the only thing well documented and useful in books are the deadly plants in the area, for example some very promising roots that I have discovered are not even found in books.
Sometimes you can even find interesting information, but then practical application is a whole other thing, ther is need of years of contact with the nature, intuition and experimentation.

At one of the few courses on wild plants organized in the area I did not go because it was too expensive. At random day I met the expert who organized the course, and she started giving talks about roots full of negative and dark energies and flowers full of solar energy...

I did not clearly understand this part:

When the prefrontal cortex drags along everything else to their displeasure, that still is rule, just internal.

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Majrelende wrote

Thank you-- I am glad you found it encouraging.

About the part about the prefrontal cortex pulling along everything else, that is to say that when one part of the body is controlling the rest of the body, then I consider it to still be a form of domination - just internally, rather than over other people. In this case it means you doing something that makes the rest of you protest and feel unwell, out of a desire to do something to help the greater good.

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kuppilary wrote

Hey I am dealing with the same feelings rn. I dont really have solution, just wanted to say you are not alone in this.

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veuzi wrote (edited )

I mean, are you trying to hold yourself to some moral standard of "wildness"? Are you afraid that if you keep studying hacking and programming that you will go back to being some techbro?

We're all hypocrites to some extent in this fucked up society. I may not obsess consumeristically over audio hardware and synthesizers like I did 10 years ago but I'm still producing mostly electronic music with the same proprietary DAW I have been using since forever on a laptop manufactured by a multi-national corporation that I hate. I do it because I enjoy it, even if it means using mass-produced tech dug out of the ground and assembled by slaves.

Maybe you just need more of a balance? Maybe you just find that the tech/hacking stuff is easier to default to compared to going out to the mountains, and so to adjust your effort accordingly? In the end, It's up to you to curate your passions, I guess.

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stagn2 OP wrote

It's not about morality, I'm coming to the conclusion that I can't carry on both passions, and for me the "wild" stuff is much more important than "tech" stuff

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kore wrote

I think computers are pretty neat. I think programming computers can be considered as art and/or craft, and from that perspective it is sort of just a medium of expression.

if you don't like it you shouldn't do it but there's ways to think about computers and the way we use them in ways that aren't rigid and controlling.

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