Submitted by Catsforfun in AskRaddle

x-posted from f/privacy

So i gave them my phone bc i had evidence of sex crimes off someone else's phone and I take that seriously. I knew they may well download my whole phone but I dont really care too too much about that.

But now I'm getting "contentkeeper" notifications on my google chrome on my phone and that never happened before. I had never even heard of it before, but it's a surveillance program that schools are using for student devices. Or that's what I learned anyway.

Why tf would cops put that on my phone when I willingly gave them evidence? Is this a documented reality? Is it legal? Can I get it off my phone?

I have no idea what they could possibly hope to be getting from doing that. I'm probably going to get a new phone at this point. I know that the cops aren't a good resource, but for sex crimes, it had to be on paper in the system somewhere, thus I reported and gave the evidence .

fuck me for "doing the right thing" and happy mayhem to all of you.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

I recommend to factory reset and give away the phone to someone who needs it, and delete your google accounts.

You may also want to move if you can, and in general lie low. The police would only do this if they thought you were involved in the crime you reported, or another crime they can prosecute.

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Vulgar_Soda wrote

This seems excessive at first glance, but considering the fact that Catsforfun is active on a known anarchist forum that allows for the posting of illegalist content, a little paranoia is warranted. The phone was only compromised after handing it over to the cops. It adds up.

The police would only do this if they thought you were involved in the crime you reported, or another crime they can prosecute.

I'll second this, but another possibility is that a lone creep is trying to track Catsforfun for personal reasons. There are plenty of stories of individual cops abusing their power to get close to and take advantage of random people. Either way, I'd be wary of using anything connected to that phone going forward.

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zoom_zip wrote

funny that it’s coming through your chrome

if it’s linked to your google account somehow, getting a new phone might not even be enough. you might need new accounts too

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zoom_zip wrote

i looked it up and saw this as a selling point on their website:

See every web action and reaction in real-time, across every device, every browser, and every platform.

time to throw that phone in the sewer hole

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Vulgar_Soda wrote

time to throw that phone in the sewer hole

and the google account. and everything else tied to that phone. Sucks. Sorry, Catsforfun!

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throwaway wrote

OP may want to trash everything digital that contains even the smallest proprietary blob, and go over to smoke signalling.

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Vulgar_Soda wrote

smoke signalling

Now we're talking. Ditch all tech. Become a wizard. Burn the cop station to send over a hello, and I'll burn a McDonald's to say hi back.

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bloodrose wrote

I tried to gogle how to remove it but it seems to me that all the sites are people who want to remove it from devices they don't own. Thus, it is all how to get around it while not having admin rights. Have you considered calling the company's support and getting directions on how to remove it? If you have admin rights, you should be able to remove it.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

Most people do not have rooted phones, because having root privileges on a mobile device is asking for problems on a long enough time scale, and also it would interfere with surveillance software that is put on the phone by the manufacturer and distributors and service providers.

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bloodrose wrote

I thought the reference to chrome was that it was following them on not just their phone as well. I'm a straight ludite so I don't trust the darn phones to start, heh.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

None of us should trusted the publicly switched telephone network, everything it touches reeks of spying. You are right to be distrustful

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AnarchoDoom wrote (edited )

It's true that whatever's corporate-run telecoms is a control grid. Tho if someone only uses their rooted phone on LineageOS only for wifi (and changing your MAC address often), it's actually even less problematic than most laptops, as there's no known backdoors like Intel IME on phones (but I feel naive saying this, so who knows?).

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celebratedrecluse wrote

Really? The Intel management engine has backdoors, as do AMD equivalent (forget its name). I would be shocked if they...just didn't put these in the phones, which are literal spying machines.

Additionally, all cell phones contain a modem which is almost never well-isolated from the rest of the computer, and which can invisibly monitor and alter various functions of the phone including sensors and data radios etc, without any way for someone on the device to notice. This gives total control not only to the carrier, but also to anyone with a IMSI catcher/spoofer ("Stingray") etc. The countermeasures so far implemented for this are all black boxes of proprietary code, as are the NDAs protecting the IMSI catcher technology companies, so there's no way to verify how bad/widespread the problem is.

Putting phone in airplane mode doesn't do shit if the modem isn't isolated, which it won't be on anything but a phone so suspicious to buy, it will in and of itself make you of interest to the surveillance apparatus.

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AnarchoDoom wrote

The modem can be turned off in rooted phone, I think. There's programs used for disabling any service or module. But if that's a modem working underneath the OS in a hidden subsystem of sorts, that's another story...

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celebratedrecluse wrote

It is working underneath it, bootloader is almost never unlocked even if phone is rooted. and there are sub-OS systems that allow the cell modems to function, yes.

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AnarchoDoom wrote (edited )

Most rooting methods these days involve having to unlock the bootloader. Some devices a few years back could be rooted through some exploit or by (lol) asking the company for it.

And yes, when it is unlocked, it is unlocked. I know for having done it many times on different phones. If "ifconfig __ down" cannot turn down the modem, anyone would be able to see that. I did it on the rooted devices I had, and it was able to shut down any modem as far as I know. This is stuff you just cannot do on a non-rooted phone, as just with other Linux distros you need root privileges to do this.

So if what you say is true, it'd be either

1- a hidden modem that ifconfig can't detect, which is some major news.

2- the locked bootloader would be the only trick in the way to full device control, keeping users from switch on/off the modem, by also preventing from rooting, in the first place.

Logically, given how the cell phone companies have been actively locking down bootloaders on phones the past few years (down to being written in chips as read-only, so your only hope is to change the memory chip), it's likely that it's the second option.

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celebratedrecluse wrote

Yes, i mean the second. However, there are elements to the modem which are embedded into the chip, and not accessible through the OS at all. so, both

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AnarchoDoom wrote

so there's no way to verify how bad/widespread the problem is.

I cannot disagree with this. tho. :-(

The hardware side of things is where privacy-focused programmers are hitting a giant wall.

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__0 wrote

Basically any time police have access to a device they have a good opportunity to bug it. No doubt that they did here.

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aaaaargZombies wrote

Have you thought about contacting EFF or similar, they might be interested and have advice.

I don't know your gender but there's been lots of cases of police abusing access to phones/computers to spy on women.

If you're being subjected to targeted surveillance you probably have a bigger problem than just the phone.

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GreenGiant wrote

Take the SIM card out, connect to random wifi and research completely random shit. Give them tons of irrelevant data to try and search through. After that dump the phone.

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MHC wrote

Don't use Google anything! That's a surveillance outfit and not much else.

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bomprimo wrote

  1. Have you posted this from your phone? If yes, omg.
  2. Change all the accounts that you used from your cellphone
  3. Reset your phone and give or sell your phone to someone else
  4. Get a new cellphone and do the following things: a) Encrypt the phone and set a password to enter on the phone b) Choose another password (password 2) to register to clearnet accounts c) Use your phone only for clearnet accounts (you could use protonmail and mega.nz instead of gmail and google drive) d) To browse this website and all websites that you don't want Big Brother to know about get yourself a computer running Linux (Whonix if possibly). From there install Tails on a usb drive if you wish Good luck.
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