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Stigmata wrote (edited )

I’m in the US so of course things are a bit different, but here, many places there is no special license to own a gun (with the exception of a permit to conceal it). Where I am I need a license to own a handgun but rifles and pretty much everything else you just do a background check and you are good to go. I know a lot of users here are not in the US, but for a lot of people here (the US) licensing seems to be confusing, they either think you need a really hard to get license, or you don’t need anything, the reality is more in the middle with there being a process to get a gun but it’s pretty short.

As far as training goes in my experience people seem to either “get” gun safety or they don’t. Of course you should practice shooting so you are more accurate, but in terms of actual training I’d say a couple of hours with an experienced gun owner is probably fine (with the exception of some more specialty firearms). I know that may seem a bit casual, but there really is not a ton to learn with gun safety. Also ammo is ridiculously expensive right now, if you are training 10 hours/month you are gonna be broke quick. But definitely make sure you are comfortable with more dangerous things like cleaning (which is seemingly when most accidents happen).

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lettuceLeafer OP wrote (edited )

I think everything you said is somewhat fair. Tho the gun licensing varies a ton by state. Mine requires you to get a FOID card for ammunition which takes an average of several months to get. But yeah most red states it's pretty easy to get a Gun. Yeah, I was just thinking about my getting a Gun when in reality I'm in one of the most challenging states to get a Gun. So it's easier for most others in the US

Tho I still think one should be regularly reminding themself and purposefully going through all the safety stuff since the danger of one slip up with a Gun is so high.

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Stigmata wrote (edited )

Oh yeah; you definitely are right then with the expense and time in your case. I have a habit of forgetting that stuff varies wildly by not only state but even county.

Yeah, the danger is definitely there, and when you do slip up it can be really bad. Somewhat anecdotal but it seems like slip ups occur more often with those experienced with guns; probably due to a combination of just proximity but also complacency. I think the old saying goes something like “the moment you get too comfortable is when you get killed”, I work with high voltage sometimes and always try to remember that, and I think it applies pretty well to guns too.

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