Submitted by aaaaargZombies in AskRaddle

The news of a the Korean anarchist library made me think! English is the primary language of Raddle and sometimes acts as a bridging language in other spaces I've found myself in, I wonder where Raddle is bridged to.

I barely speak English and can only utter a couple of other words in different European languages.

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Kinshavo wrote

Three and a half , but with many orthographic and grmmar miztakes

I speak with barbaric tongues

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loukanikos wrote

I could claim to speak as many as four languages, if we are rounding up. I'm including in that list a language I can understand pretty well but I barely speak/read/write. I understand it because its my partner's mother tongue and I hear it spoken all day long but many of the sounds remain difficult for me to pronounce. I've also failed to learn the alphabet but have no real need to learn it anyways. French remains my favorite language, followed by Persian -- although I only know a few words of Persian.

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masque wrote (edited )

I can speak (as in actually naturally hold a conversation in) French and Esperanto. German and Latin I can read semi-ok but definitely not speak.

I have tried learning Mandarin and Farsi on-again-off-again, but I definitely wouldn't say I speak either of them.

EDIT: I've now noticed that the phrasing of the question is more about how many Raddle users speak a first language other than English. In case it wasn't clear, English is my first language.

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moonlune wrote (edited )

CEFR C2 in 2, A2 in 1 that I learned at school (it was B1 at some point), and nearly A1 in the language I'm learning right now.

I'm also trying to learn toki pona if that counts lol

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Ennui wrote (edited )

I guess I speak influent German now. Used to be, I didn’t want to learn a foreign language because it was so difficult. Now I want to learn them all so that I can read philosophical literature at its best.

Order of operations for the future is German, then French and/or Spanish, then probably non-Western languages depending on what philosophy I’m interested in. I’m honestly scared of Romance languages after seeing how easy German is for an English speaker to learn.

Edit: A word.

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masque wrote

What do you mean by "love languages"?

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Ennui wrote

I confused the terms love language and Romance language—whoops. In case you still don’t know, Romance languages are those derived from a Latin base, Spanish, French, and Italian among them.

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masque wrote (edited )

I'm well aware of the Romance languages, having studied Latin.

EDIT: Also, don't be scared of them. French, in particular, is arguably easier than German for an English speaker to learn, due to English having a very large amount of borrowed French vocabulary (plus the grammar is more similar in many ways; no weird declension, weird V2 word order, etc. like in German).

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Ennui wrote

I like fucked up word order...

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masque wrote (edited )

If you want really fun word order, you should pick a non-indo-european language like, say, Hawaiian (which is VSO), or maybe a highly inflected language like Latin where word order is kinda optional.

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86944 wrote

I can order food and ask where the toilet is in Spanish. I can also make certain that the food isn't just meatless but also without pollo and pescado. Because a lot of people from South America think that chicken and fish isn't meat for some reason.

I found an article recently about communicating during a disaster, and how translating tornado to Spanish doesn't always convey the urgency of the situation.

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masque wrote (edited )

If carne doesn't include chicken/fish in South American Spanish, that doesn't mean that people from South America "think that chicken and fish isn't meat," it just means that the word "meat" and the word "carne" are not fully synonymous.

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Vulgar_Soda wrote

a lot of people from South America think that chicken and fish isn't meat for some reason.

a lot of people in the US and beyond hold similar views, but okay.

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loukanikos wrote

I believe the word carne means both meat and beef depending on the context, which probably explains that confusion

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subrosa wrote

German and English. I can follow a movie in French, but it's exhausting.

My German comes in Austro-Bavarian and 'clean', the former practically a foreign language to most Germans.

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kano wrote

I can speak english and broken german

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aaaaargZombies OP wrote

Interesting! A strong German contingent. I have to admire the ambitiousness of Esperanto despite it's flaws.

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Majrelende wrote (edited )

A little tangent: I am getting somewhere on the road to fluency in my invented language, but speaking English in everyday life slows my sentence formation in Nameless-speech— that language is much more verb-heavy and agglutinative, and there are none of the clichés that English has. To call trees “it” feels more and more discomforting after the third-person pronouns for humans and trees in the language are one. I begin to think, maybe English can be reformed, but why bother? I rather prefer the new language.

Aside from that, I speak a bit of Spanish and I probably would speak more Norwegian than that if I bothered to practice. If I really wanted to, I think I have the capacity for more, although not the motivation. No one speaks it, and I have grown more and more to use electronics only when I need to.

I have also dabbled in other languages: I probably can recite the numbers from one to ten in Nepali, and maybe a sentence or two, on a good day.

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temtemy wrote

Kamusta, I speak Tagalog. I also can barely speak Spanish, but I only know how to speak numbers in Spanish. Very convenient when you want to tell the time.

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MHC wrote

أنا أتكلم العربية قليلا.

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