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ruin wrote

You can get land with good soil for closer to 1k an acre in the southeast, southern appalachians, and out towards the ozarks. But, as you mentioned, it’s nowhere you’d want to live if you are at all interested in being social.

Some western states you’ll even run into water rights issues, as in you can’t even collect rain water or have a well since you don’t own the water just your land.

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_caspar_ wrote

"But, as you mentioned, it’s nowhere you’d want to live if you are at all interested in being social."

covid has made that a default almost anywhere now. and in the coming years (though maybe not as extreme as in 10-20yrs), I expect there to be a more dramatic migratory shift with folks being forced out of cities due to cost, and further away from higher climate instability zones (southeast and southwest) due to high heat, humidity, and coastal storms/sea level rise. this will change the culture in places like appalachia and the ozarks. plus being near a college town/city draws in a few people from everywhere.

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ruin wrote

It’ll be interesting to see.

We have a lot of people move out to our area all excited about nature and solitude. Usually a winter is enough to send them back to the city.

It’s different in the summer when the weather is nice, weekenders from the city are up, farmers markets going. I’d guess the population is triple the winter in the small towns on a weekend. Lots of nice liberal folks to talk farm to table dinners with. Winter is long, cold, and isolating.

I’m not saying it’s not changing, just that it will take time. Country life isn’t for everyone.

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_caspar_ wrote

I agree, and some cities might trend higher rent, some lower. I was mainly thinking of migration from places like Houston, New Orleans, Miami, and Phoenix that might become too unsuitable to live in a decade or so. it will also be strange to see what happens to commercial spaces becoming vacant due to more employees working from home and employers not wanting to pay for the space, and if that will actually be a factor at all.

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