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masque wrote

A substantial percentage of your posting history consists of you looking for a meaningful hobby or interest but dismissing every specific hobby that you or someone else has suggested, often for tangential reasons like an association with "nerds" or "libertarian fucks" or a vague lack of motivation.

The "perfect hobby" that's simultaneously meaningful, intrinsically motivating, and free from all negative social connotations is not going to come along, especially if you keep dismissing things before getting involved enough to find out whether you actually enjoy them. Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

To answer your original question, the obvious examples that come to mind are a wide range of DIY activities (woodworking, metalworking, whittling, leathercraft, etc.).

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[deleted] wrote

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masque wrote

I'm trying to get back to programming with a game engine right now.

Great! I saw you mention Godot a while ago. I finished my first Godot project recently and found it very nice to work with, although my background is obviously different than yours.

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Raxalor wrote

Basing my 'traditionally masculine' things in stereotypes from the late 1800s to the early 1900s

  • Mechanical modification and repair (bicycles, cars, motorcycles, clocks, etc)

  • Carpentry

  • Shoe making

  • Moonshining

  • Running the local Mob

  • Getting into shootouts with the Pinkertons

  • Robbing train cars and banks with Tommy Guns

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[deleted] wrote

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Raxalor wrote

This list is going to contain my biases for what masculinity means to me, which tends to be skills for surviving and body control (reflexes, strength, etc)

  • Mechanical modification and repair (bicycles, cars, motorcycles, clocks, etc)
  • Carpentry
  • Survivalist camping
  • Knife making (or blacksmithing in general)
  • Parkour
  • Gymnastics
  • Martial arts
  • Marksmanship
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rot wrote

why do you need to do non-nerdy masculine things?

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Ennui wrote

By nerdy, do you mean cringeworthy? One might call themselves a car nerd, a philosophy nerd, or a military nerd, but those don’t carry the same implications as the “nerd” as a social character.

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[deleted] wrote (edited )

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Ennui wrote

I think, that you should just do what you like, and spend time with people you like.

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Bezotcovschina wrote

I agree wit a lot of things that fellow raddlers have already said.

As for me - being nerd is cool. Now especially. Throw away your outdated misconceptions of nerdiness. If you like something nerdy - follow your desire, it's the most coolest thing ever.

What will never-ever be cool - is forcing yourself into things you don't like. Most of the times it looks completely pathetic.

You can try different hobbies not worrying how masculine or nerdy they are. Your desire, your confidentness - is all that matter to be cool.

As for socialization - you certainly won't like it being put into social circles that judge you upon how masculine or not-nerdy your interests are. Sure, a lot of nerdy circles have their own problems, but I think eventually you will be able to find one you feel comfortable with.

I really know how it feels, really. And I know how rewarding it is to pursue what you really want.

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Hopium wrote

Cars, sports, tits, DIY, socializing.

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keez wrote

Cars is the laziest and effortless hobby ever dont @ me

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[deleted] wrote

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keez wrote

No but seriously. Have you thought about it?

Fixing and styling cars is different. I'm talking about people who admire cars (often fancy ones), nothing else

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CaptainACAB wrote

socializing

That's the most gender neutral interest a person could have.

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