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Splinglebot wrote

is the title supposed to be in the negative? as in:

Tyranny is only as powerful as those who aren't willing to stand up to it

because otherwise it eludes me

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n_n OP wrote

I think that is referring to stand up as a bystander.

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Splinglebot wrote

yes, but isn't the point that tyranny is more powerful when bystanders don't stand up to it? The title "Tyranny is only powerful as those willing to stand up to it" suggests that it's more powerful when people do stand up to it.

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n_n OP wrote (edited )

The title is attached to the content of the opinion piece and their meaning is given by what it is said there. It do not exist in a different plane, so if you don't read the content there you wont find much sense in it by itself.

Edit: Sorry if I can't give a better answer, English is not my first language.

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Splinglebot wrote

I read it, but the title still doesn't make sense to me. The article seems to be suggesting those who stand by and do nothing are helping tyranny. But the title is saying the opposite of that - it says that tyranny is only as powerful as those who stand up to it, that is those who stand against tyranny. Hence the confusion, it makes no sense in isolation or in the context of the article for tyranny to be able to get stronger as a result of people opposing it. Hence I wondered if the title was a mistake and was actually supposed to say the opposite, that tyranny is only as strong as people that don't stand against it.

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n_n OP wrote (edited )

Maybe he use the term "to stand up to" as to withstand, not as oppose. Tho I dunno if that makes a difference.

Edit: I read it again, and seems to say that because people try to withstand tyranny without fight, this one prevailed. So they were active supporters by don't fight. The tyranny was as powerful as the will to no fight. Hope that I make sense.

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Splinglebot wrote

That does make a lot more sense. To be honest I'd never heard "to stand up to" used to mean "to withstand" in the context of people, I've only ever heard it as "to stand against" such as in "they stood up to the school bully". Honestly I'd forgotten that the term was ever even used to mean "to withstand"

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